Top 5 MySQL Community Wishes

I take the easy way out again this week by sharing Guy Kawasaki (of the How To Change the World blog) and his irreverent and truthful keynote at the 2007 MySQL Users Conference.

Kawasaki will challenge your thoughts about being an entrepreneur in the technology industry.

The big news is that soon I’ll be able to announce that the videos from the conference sessions are up….stay tuned!

Show Notes:
Guy Kawasaki’s Blog: How to Change the World
http://blog.guykawasaki.com/

Direct play this episode at:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-16%3A-art-innovation%2C-guy-kawasaki

Download all podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

Subscribe to the podcast at:
http://feeds.feedburner.com/oursql

Feedback:

Email podcast@technocation.org

call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369

use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Or use the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum

Today I upgraded the blog software at sheeri.com (and sheeri.net and sheeri.org). Please let me know if you find something that doesn’t work as expected — awfief@gmail.com.

At the MySQL Users Conference, hepatitis prostate my good friend Mark Atwood (creator of the free Amazon S3 Storage Engine) mentioned that any site with a login should have OpenID as an option.

Mark, anabolics I upgraded for you! I was using WordPress 1.5.2, there now I’m at the “latest” version. Anyway, this is just to let folks know that if you so choose, you may now use OpenId if you wish to login and make comments.

Of course, I do not require login (and have a great spam filter) so that’s just another choice you have.
Today I upgraded the blog software at sheeri.com (and sheeri.net and sheeri.org). Please let me know if you find something that doesn’t work as expected — awfief@gmail.com.

At the MySQL Users Conference, hepatitis prostate my good friend Mark Atwood (creator of the free Amazon S3 Storage Engine) mentioned that any site with a login should have OpenID as an option.

Mark, anabolics I upgraded for you! I was using WordPress 1.5.2, there now I’m at the “latest” version. Anyway, this is just to let folks know that if you so choose, you may now use OpenId if you wish to login and make comments.

Of course, I do not require login (and have a great spam filter) so that’s just another choice you have.
You’ve heard me on the MySQL Podcast at http://www.technocation.org, urticaria now come work with me, prostate the “She”-BA!

The company I work for is an online social networking/dating site. Our main product is for men seeking men in 87 countries throughout the world. We’re looking for another MySQL DBA, as designing schemas maintaining data integrity for our 1 million users (and growing fast!). The salary is dependent upon experience of course, but the company I work for pays on the high side of the industry standard for the Boston area.

Application Instructions
Please send cover letter, résumé and sample schema to work@online-buddies.com, with “MySQL DBA” as your subject. The
sample schema should reflect your abilities, so if you send along a schema you would like to see improved, include a description of what you would love to do to that schema to make it better.

The fun “requirements”:

  • A schema of 1 database with 85 tables — all of which have an auto-increment id as their primary key — makes you cringe
  • Knowing the difference between InnoDB and MyISAM storage engines and when you might use them
  • You cry when you see field names like “ExtraInfo1” and “ExtraInfo2”
  • You want to poke your own eyes out when you see schemas full of varchar(20) default NULL
  • When someone says, “Can you add a [type, ie, INT, BLOB] field to the table for me?” your first response is, “Sure, why do you need it?”
  • You know that “data warehouse” is not a synonym for “replicated copy of the database” — and if you did not, your first thought upon reading that was “It isn’t? I wonder how the schemas would be different?”
  • When designing a schema, you draw out an ER diagram first (or are willing to learn how)
  • Thinking about what data will be stored is the most important thing to you when you’re creating a table, not how the application will access it
  • You are comfortable with a job that does not involve writing code in a procedural language, but are comfortable enough if you have to help debug code written in a procedural language that you could.
  • You answer the question ‘Do images belong in the filesystem or the database?’ with ‘it depends’ and can go through scenarios of when each one is appropriate. (Alternatively you say “I have no idea” and do some research)

On to the more boring description…..

MySQL Database Administrator

The MySQL DBA will ensure that all data remains consistent across the database, that the data is clearly defined, that all users access data concurrently, in a form that suits their needs, that there is provision for data security and recovery control (all data is retrievable in an emergency).

Essential Duties/Tasks

* assist in establishing the needs of users;
* plan dataflow for a new or revised database;
* help design databases;
* test all new systems;
* maintain data standards, including adherence to the Data Protection Act, C.I.S.P or other security requirements as implemented and dictated;
* write database documentation, including data standards, procedures and definitions for the data dictionary;
* control access permissions and privileges;
* ensuring that storage, archiving, backup and recovery procedures are functioning correctly;
* capacity planning;
* work closely with IT project managers, programmers and developers;
* provide technical support for outdated legacy systems;
* ensure the database integrity and security;
* commission and install new applications.

Knowledge of Industry, Product, and Technology

* Bachelor’s degree
* At least 2 years of experience that is directly related to the
duties and responsibilities specified.

Education and other Qualifications

* Knowledge of current technological developments/trends in area
of expertise.
* Ability to interpret data models and to develop database structures.
* Ability to use standard diagramming techniques to design and
develop computer data models.
* Ability to configure, manage, and maintain the operation of
complex relational databases.
* Ability to develop and manipulate large, complex data sets.
* Knowledge of computer and/or network security systems,
applications, procedures, and techniques.
* Ability to operate on a scheduled 24-hour on-call basis.
* Knowledge of data integrity methods and techniques a plus.
* Technical writing skills.
* Ability to install, maintain, modify, and upgrade MySQL.

About our Company
Founded in 2001, Online Buddies Inc., continues to enjoy extraordinary growth as we achieve worldwide recognition for our product range of alternative lifestyle online personals; each providing safe, friendly and exciting sites through which members can express themselves, communicate and interact with one another as they wish.

Our Mission is to build upon our reputation as an internationally regarded leader for online personals as well as an organization that positively impacts the communities we serve. We work to accomplish this goal through partnerships with local, state and federal health and human service organizations; providing our members with accurate and easily accessible health-related information.

We acknowledge that our success begins with our ability to select a uniquely talented and diverse workforce that is afforded equal opportunity to enjoy both personal and professional growth, contributing to our collective success as we work to achieve our individual aspirations.

Application Instructions (repeated from top)
Application Instructions
Please send cover letter, résumé and sample schema to work@online-buddies.com, with “MySQL DBA” as your subject. The
sample schema should reflect your abilities, so if you send along a schema you would like to see improved, include a description of what you would love to do to that schema to make it better.
Today I upgraded the blog software at sheeri.com (and sheeri.net and sheeri.org). Please let me know if you find something that doesn’t work as expected — awfief@gmail.com.

At the MySQL Users Conference, hepatitis prostate my good friend Mark Atwood (creator of the free Amazon S3 Storage Engine) mentioned that any site with a login should have OpenID as an option.

Mark, anabolics I upgraded for you! I was using WordPress 1.5.2, there now I’m at the “latest” version. Anyway, this is just to let folks know that if you so choose, you may now use OpenId if you wish to login and make comments.

Of course, I do not require login (and have a great spam filter) so that’s just another choice you have.
You’ve heard me on the MySQL Podcast at http://www.technocation.org, urticaria now come work with me, prostate the “She”-BA!

The company I work for is an online social networking/dating site. Our main product is for men seeking men in 87 countries throughout the world. We’re looking for another MySQL DBA, as designing schemas maintaining data integrity for our 1 million users (and growing fast!). The salary is dependent upon experience of course, but the company I work for pays on the high side of the industry standard for the Boston area.

Application Instructions
Please send cover letter, résumé and sample schema to work@online-buddies.com, with “MySQL DBA” as your subject. The
sample schema should reflect your abilities, so if you send along a schema you would like to see improved, include a description of what you would love to do to that schema to make it better.

The fun “requirements”:

  • A schema of 1 database with 85 tables — all of which have an auto-increment id as their primary key — makes you cringe
  • Knowing the difference between InnoDB and MyISAM storage engines and when you might use them
  • You cry when you see field names like “ExtraInfo1” and “ExtraInfo2”
  • You want to poke your own eyes out when you see schemas full of varchar(20) default NULL
  • When someone says, “Can you add a [type, ie, INT, BLOB] field to the table for me?” your first response is, “Sure, why do you need it?”
  • You know that “data warehouse” is not a synonym for “replicated copy of the database” — and if you did not, your first thought upon reading that was “It isn’t? I wonder how the schemas would be different?”
  • When designing a schema, you draw out an ER diagram first (or are willing to learn how)
  • Thinking about what data will be stored is the most important thing to you when you’re creating a table, not how the application will access it
  • You are comfortable with a job that does not involve writing code in a procedural language, but are comfortable enough if you have to help debug code written in a procedural language that you could.
  • You answer the question ‘Do images belong in the filesystem or the database?’ with ‘it depends’ and can go through scenarios of when each one is appropriate. (Alternatively you say “I have no idea” and do some research)

On to the more boring description…..

MySQL Database Administrator

The MySQL DBA will ensure that all data remains consistent across the database, that the data is clearly defined, that all users access data concurrently, in a form that suits their needs, that there is provision for data security and recovery control (all data is retrievable in an emergency).

Essential Duties/Tasks

* assist in establishing the needs of users;
* plan dataflow for a new or revised database;
* help design databases;
* test all new systems;
* maintain data standards, including adherence to the Data Protection Act, C.I.S.P or other security requirements as implemented and dictated;
* write database documentation, including data standards, procedures and definitions for the data dictionary;
* control access permissions and privileges;
* ensuring that storage, archiving, backup and recovery procedures are functioning correctly;
* capacity planning;
* work closely with IT project managers, programmers and developers;
* provide technical support for outdated legacy systems;
* ensure the database integrity and security;
* commission and install new applications.

Knowledge of Industry, Product, and Technology

* Bachelor’s degree
* At least 2 years of experience that is directly related to the
duties and responsibilities specified.

Education and other Qualifications

* Knowledge of current technological developments/trends in area
of expertise.
* Ability to interpret data models and to develop database structures.
* Ability to use standard diagramming techniques to design and
develop computer data models.
* Ability to configure, manage, and maintain the operation of
complex relational databases.
* Ability to develop and manipulate large, complex data sets.
* Knowledge of computer and/or network security systems,
applications, procedures, and techniques.
* Ability to operate on a scheduled 24-hour on-call basis.
* Knowledge of data integrity methods and techniques a plus.
* Technical writing skills.
* Ability to install, maintain, modify, and upgrade MySQL.

About our Company
Founded in 2001, Online Buddies Inc., continues to enjoy extraordinary growth as we achieve worldwide recognition for our product range of alternative lifestyle online personals; each providing safe, friendly and exciting sites through which members can express themselves, communicate and interact with one another as they wish.

Our Mission is to build upon our reputation as an internationally regarded leader for online personals as well as an organization that positively impacts the communities we serve. We work to accomplish this goal through partnerships with local, state and federal health and human service organizations; providing our members with accurate and easily accessible health-related information.

We acknowledge that our success begins with our ability to select a uniquely talented and diverse workforce that is afforded equal opportunity to enjoy both personal and professional growth, contributing to our collective success as we work to achieve our individual aspirations.

Application Instructions (repeated from top)
Application Instructions
Please send cover letter, résumé and sample schema to work@online-buddies.com, with “MySQL DBA” as your subject. The
sample schema should reflect your abilities, so if you send along a schema you would like to see improved, include a description of what you would love to do to that schema to make it better.
Mehlam Shakir, CTO of RippleTech, prescription discusses a practical approach for auditing MySQL databases to meet security and compliance regulations. Hear real-world cases and see a live demonstration of how RippleTech’s Informant solution compliments MySQL by adding a security layer without any performance impact.

For more information on RippleTech’s INFORMANT, mycoplasmosis visit http://www.rippletech.com/

I have to say, I was a bit worried this would be a typical vendor presentation where every other word is marketing speak for how great the product is. It actually just ended up being “here’s how Informant works, and here’s how auditing, security and compliance needs can be met,” presented in a way that’s useful and valuable to anyone who is interested in auditing or security.

Rippletech’s Informant is not only interesting because it’s currently the only software that audits MySQL, but it’s impressive in its simplicity and flexibility. I think my favorite surprise about Informant was that it has the ability to store a user session as just that.

Download the video of the presentation at:
http://technocation.org/movies/mysql/AuditingRippleTech2007MayUGbig.wmv”>http://technocation.org/movies/mysql/AuditingRippleTech2007MayUGbig.wmv

http://technocation.org/movies/mysql/AuditingRippleTech2007MayUGbig.wmv (446 Mb)

Today I upgraded the blog software at sheeri.com (and sheeri.net and sheeri.org). Please let me know if you find something that doesn’t work as expected — awfief@gmail.com.

At the MySQL Users Conference, hepatitis prostate my good friend Mark Atwood (creator of the free Amazon S3 Storage Engine) mentioned that any site with a login should have OpenID as an option.

Mark, anabolics I upgraded for you! I was using WordPress 1.5.2, there now I’m at the “latest” version. Anyway, this is just to let folks know that if you so choose, you may now use OpenId if you wish to login and make comments.

Of course, I do not require login (and have a great spam filter) so that’s just another choice you have.
You’ve heard me on the MySQL Podcast at http://www.technocation.org, urticaria now come work with me, prostate the “She”-BA!

The company I work for is an online social networking/dating site. Our main product is for men seeking men in 87 countries throughout the world. We’re looking for another MySQL DBA, as designing schemas maintaining data integrity for our 1 million users (and growing fast!). The salary is dependent upon experience of course, but the company I work for pays on the high side of the industry standard for the Boston area.

Application Instructions
Please send cover letter, résumé and sample schema to work@online-buddies.com, with “MySQL DBA” as your subject. The
sample schema should reflect your abilities, so if you send along a schema you would like to see improved, include a description of what you would love to do to that schema to make it better.

The fun “requirements”:

  • A schema of 1 database with 85 tables — all of which have an auto-increment id as their primary key — makes you cringe
  • Knowing the difference between InnoDB and MyISAM storage engines and when you might use them
  • You cry when you see field names like “ExtraInfo1” and “ExtraInfo2”
  • You want to poke your own eyes out when you see schemas full of varchar(20) default NULL
  • When someone says, “Can you add a [type, ie, INT, BLOB] field to the table for me?” your first response is, “Sure, why do you need it?”
  • You know that “data warehouse” is not a synonym for “replicated copy of the database” — and if you did not, your first thought upon reading that was “It isn’t? I wonder how the schemas would be different?”
  • When designing a schema, you draw out an ER diagram first (or are willing to learn how)
  • Thinking about what data will be stored is the most important thing to you when you’re creating a table, not how the application will access it
  • You are comfortable with a job that does not involve writing code in a procedural language, but are comfortable enough if you have to help debug code written in a procedural language that you could.
  • You answer the question ‘Do images belong in the filesystem or the database?’ with ‘it depends’ and can go through scenarios of when each one is appropriate. (Alternatively you say “I have no idea” and do some research)

On to the more boring description…..

MySQL Database Administrator

The MySQL DBA will ensure that all data remains consistent across the database, that the data is clearly defined, that all users access data concurrently, in a form that suits their needs, that there is provision for data security and recovery control (all data is retrievable in an emergency).

Essential Duties/Tasks

* assist in establishing the needs of users;
* plan dataflow for a new or revised database;
* help design databases;
* test all new systems;
* maintain data standards, including adherence to the Data Protection Act, C.I.S.P or other security requirements as implemented and dictated;
* write database documentation, including data standards, procedures and definitions for the data dictionary;
* control access permissions and privileges;
* ensuring that storage, archiving, backup and recovery procedures are functioning correctly;
* capacity planning;
* work closely with IT project managers, programmers and developers;
* provide technical support for outdated legacy systems;
* ensure the database integrity and security;
* commission and install new applications.

Knowledge of Industry, Product, and Technology

* Bachelor’s degree
* At least 2 years of experience that is directly related to the
duties and responsibilities specified.

Education and other Qualifications

* Knowledge of current technological developments/trends in area
of expertise.
* Ability to interpret data models and to develop database structures.
* Ability to use standard diagramming techniques to design and
develop computer data models.
* Ability to configure, manage, and maintain the operation of
complex relational databases.
* Ability to develop and manipulate large, complex data sets.
* Knowledge of computer and/or network security systems,
applications, procedures, and techniques.
* Ability to operate on a scheduled 24-hour on-call basis.
* Knowledge of data integrity methods and techniques a plus.
* Technical writing skills.
* Ability to install, maintain, modify, and upgrade MySQL.

About our Company
Founded in 2001, Online Buddies Inc., continues to enjoy extraordinary growth as we achieve worldwide recognition for our product range of alternative lifestyle online personals; each providing safe, friendly and exciting sites through which members can express themselves, communicate and interact with one another as they wish.

Our Mission is to build upon our reputation as an internationally regarded leader for online personals as well as an organization that positively impacts the communities we serve. We work to accomplish this goal through partnerships with local, state and federal health and human service organizations; providing our members with accurate and easily accessible health-related information.

We acknowledge that our success begins with our ability to select a uniquely talented and diverse workforce that is afforded equal opportunity to enjoy both personal and professional growth, contributing to our collective success as we work to achieve our individual aspirations.

Application Instructions (repeated from top)
Application Instructions
Please send cover letter, résumé and sample schema to work@online-buddies.com, with “MySQL DBA” as your subject. The
sample schema should reflect your abilities, so if you send along a schema you would like to see improved, include a description of what you would love to do to that schema to make it better.
Mehlam Shakir, CTO of RippleTech, prescription discusses a practical approach for auditing MySQL databases to meet security and compliance regulations. Hear real-world cases and see a live demonstration of how RippleTech’s Informant solution compliments MySQL by adding a security layer without any performance impact.

For more information on RippleTech’s INFORMANT, mycoplasmosis visit http://www.rippletech.com/

I have to say, I was a bit worried this would be a typical vendor presentation where every other word is marketing speak for how great the product is. It actually just ended up being “here’s how Informant works, and here’s how auditing, security and compliance needs can be met,” presented in a way that’s useful and valuable to anyone who is interested in auditing or security.

Rippletech’s Informant is not only interesting because it’s currently the only software that audits MySQL, but it’s impressive in its simplicity and flexibility. I think my favorite surprise about Informant was that it has the ability to store a user session as just that.

Download the video of the presentation at:
http://technocation.org/movies/mysql/AuditingRippleTech2007MayUGbig.wmv”>http://technocation.org/movies/mysql/AuditingRippleTech2007MayUGbig.wmv

http://technocation.org/movies/mysql/AuditingRippleTech2007MayUGbig.wmv (446 Mb)

http://technocation.org/content/2007-mysql-user-conference-and-expo-presentations-and-videos

Need I say more? Go download the slides, drugs video and audio from the 2007 MySQL Users Conference & Expo. I have no plans to take anything down, symptoms so please download wisely, and take only what you need. If there’s demand, I can make higher-quality versions available. I can also burn DVD’s of the content if that’s desired.

Enjoy!
Today I upgraded the blog software at sheeri.com (and sheeri.net and sheeri.org). Please let me know if you find something that doesn’t work as expected — awfief@gmail.com.

At the MySQL Users Conference, hepatitis prostate my good friend Mark Atwood (creator of the free Amazon S3 Storage Engine) mentioned that any site with a login should have OpenID as an option.

Mark, anabolics I upgraded for you! I was using WordPress 1.5.2, there now I’m at the “latest” version. Anyway, this is just to let folks know that if you so choose, you may now use OpenId if you wish to login and make comments.

Of course, I do not require login (and have a great spam filter) so that’s just another choice you have.
You’ve heard me on the MySQL Podcast at http://www.technocation.org, urticaria now come work with me, prostate the “She”-BA!

The company I work for is an online social networking/dating site. Our main product is for men seeking men in 87 countries throughout the world. We’re looking for another MySQL DBA, as designing schemas maintaining data integrity for our 1 million users (and growing fast!). The salary is dependent upon experience of course, but the company I work for pays on the high side of the industry standard for the Boston area.

Application Instructions
Please send cover letter, résumé and sample schema to work@online-buddies.com, with “MySQL DBA” as your subject. The
sample schema should reflect your abilities, so if you send along a schema you would like to see improved, include a description of what you would love to do to that schema to make it better.

The fun “requirements”:

  • A schema of 1 database with 85 tables — all of which have an auto-increment id as their primary key — makes you cringe
  • Knowing the difference between InnoDB and MyISAM storage engines and when you might use them
  • You cry when you see field names like “ExtraInfo1” and “ExtraInfo2”
  • You want to poke your own eyes out when you see schemas full of varchar(20) default NULL
  • When someone says, “Can you add a [type, ie, INT, BLOB] field to the table for me?” your first response is, “Sure, why do you need it?”
  • You know that “data warehouse” is not a synonym for “replicated copy of the database” — and if you did not, your first thought upon reading that was “It isn’t? I wonder how the schemas would be different?”
  • When designing a schema, you draw out an ER diagram first (or are willing to learn how)
  • Thinking about what data will be stored is the most important thing to you when you’re creating a table, not how the application will access it
  • You are comfortable with a job that does not involve writing code in a procedural language, but are comfortable enough if you have to help debug code written in a procedural language that you could.
  • You answer the question ‘Do images belong in the filesystem or the database?’ with ‘it depends’ and can go through scenarios of when each one is appropriate. (Alternatively you say “I have no idea” and do some research)

On to the more boring description…..

MySQL Database Administrator

The MySQL DBA will ensure that all data remains consistent across the database, that the data is clearly defined, that all users access data concurrently, in a form that suits their needs, that there is provision for data security and recovery control (all data is retrievable in an emergency).

Essential Duties/Tasks

* assist in establishing the needs of users;
* plan dataflow for a new or revised database;
* help design databases;
* test all new systems;
* maintain data standards, including adherence to the Data Protection Act, C.I.S.P or other security requirements as implemented and dictated;
* write database documentation, including data standards, procedures and definitions for the data dictionary;
* control access permissions and privileges;
* ensuring that storage, archiving, backup and recovery procedures are functioning correctly;
* capacity planning;
* work closely with IT project managers, programmers and developers;
* provide technical support for outdated legacy systems;
* ensure the database integrity and security;
* commission and install new applications.

Knowledge of Industry, Product, and Technology

* Bachelor’s degree
* At least 2 years of experience that is directly related to the
duties and responsibilities specified.

Education and other Qualifications

* Knowledge of current technological developments/trends in area
of expertise.
* Ability to interpret data models and to develop database structures.
* Ability to use standard diagramming techniques to design and
develop computer data models.
* Ability to configure, manage, and maintain the operation of
complex relational databases.
* Ability to develop and manipulate large, complex data sets.
* Knowledge of computer and/or network security systems,
applications, procedures, and techniques.
* Ability to operate on a scheduled 24-hour on-call basis.
* Knowledge of data integrity methods and techniques a plus.
* Technical writing skills.
* Ability to install, maintain, modify, and upgrade MySQL.

About our Company
Founded in 2001, Online Buddies Inc., continues to enjoy extraordinary growth as we achieve worldwide recognition for our product range of alternative lifestyle online personals; each providing safe, friendly and exciting sites through which members can express themselves, communicate and interact with one another as they wish.

Our Mission is to build upon our reputation as an internationally regarded leader for online personals as well as an organization that positively impacts the communities we serve. We work to accomplish this goal through partnerships with local, state and federal health and human service organizations; providing our members with accurate and easily accessible health-related information.

We acknowledge that our success begins with our ability to select a uniquely talented and diverse workforce that is afforded equal opportunity to enjoy both personal and professional growth, contributing to our collective success as we work to achieve our individual aspirations.

Application Instructions (repeated from top)
Application Instructions
Please send cover letter, résumé and sample schema to work@online-buddies.com, with “MySQL DBA” as your subject. The
sample schema should reflect your abilities, so if you send along a schema you would like to see improved, include a description of what you would love to do to that schema to make it better.
Mehlam Shakir, CTO of RippleTech, prescription discusses a practical approach for auditing MySQL databases to meet security and compliance regulations. Hear real-world cases and see a live demonstration of how RippleTech’s Informant solution compliments MySQL by adding a security layer without any performance impact.

For more information on RippleTech’s INFORMANT, mycoplasmosis visit http://www.rippletech.com/

I have to say, I was a bit worried this would be a typical vendor presentation where every other word is marketing speak for how great the product is. It actually just ended up being “here’s how Informant works, and here’s how auditing, security and compliance needs can be met,” presented in a way that’s useful and valuable to anyone who is interested in auditing or security.

Rippletech’s Informant is not only interesting because it’s currently the only software that audits MySQL, but it’s impressive in its simplicity and flexibility. I think my favorite surprise about Informant was that it has the ability to store a user session as just that.

Download the video of the presentation at:
http://technocation.org/movies/mysql/AuditingRippleTech2007MayUGbig.wmv”>http://technocation.org/movies/mysql/AuditingRippleTech2007MayUGbig.wmv

http://technocation.org/movies/mysql/AuditingRippleTech2007MayUGbig.wmv (446 Mb)

http://technocation.org/content/2007-mysql-user-conference-and-expo-presentations-and-videos

Need I say more? Go download the slides, drugs video and audio from the 2007 MySQL Users Conference & Expo. I have no plans to take anything down, symptoms so please download wisely, and take only what you need. If there’s demand, I can make higher-quality versions available. I can also burn DVD’s of the content if that’s desired.

Enjoy!
For folks to know — to create the page with links to conference material, surgery I took the slides from the O’Reilly official page, pill combines it with the myriad of “here are my slides” posts to Planet MySQL, approved and links to Baron, Kevin and Mike’s audio and video as well as the video and audio I processed (Because Baron made statements about bandwidth, I downloaded the .ogg files and technocation.org is hosting them, whereas Kevin and Mike’s files are linked to).

I know I hate going to 20 places to find everything I want. There’s no need for folks to have to go to more than one site, just because the content was provided by more than one person. The referenced page is one-stop shopping, as I feel it should be. If folks have anything to add (or change), I’m happy to update the page, just comment here.

So, I have updated the page at:

http://technocation.org/content/2007-mysql-user-conference-and-expo-presentations-and-videos

that fixes a link, adds some slides, and also adds the Quiz Show footage that I have. I got a late start to the Quiz Show, but I did get it in time to catch Solomon Chang’s infamous “Coder McKinnan o’ The Cubicles”. Sadly, I did not have video of the dance, but you can see that at http://people.warp.es/~nacho/blog/?p=225 — that post also contains a comment by Solomon himself with the lyrics (which he also sent to me, but I’m a bad videographer and took too long to process all the video…).

(updates to the page: Fixed the “Clash of the Database Egos” wmv link, thanks to Hakan Kücükyilmaz for pointing out the brokenness. Added the link to download slides (pdf and swf) for the SQL Kitchen talk, courtesy of Damien Seguy. Added the Quiz Show and links to audio and video.)

Go forth and enjoy!
In this episode we tackle what a hash looks like in terms of a data structure, doctor cough in preparation for next episode’s discussion on the difference between hashes and btree indexes, ailment illness and what kind of indexes are good for what kind of optimizations.

Show Notes:
Direct play this episode at:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-17%3A-hashing-it-out-0

Download all podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

Subscribe to the podcast at:
http://feeds.feedburner.com/oursql

News:
MySQL Connector/NET 5.1.1 released:
this site guid,a161d719-a554-4f01-8cd5-7b45fcb7264d.aspx”>http://tinyurl.com/23a9ax

Download the new Connector/NET version:
http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/connector/net/5.1.html

MySQL 5.0.x security vulnerability:
http://bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=27513
Solution: upgrade to 5.0.40. This bug is not known to affect major versions 3 or 4.

Learning Resource:

http://onlinesolutionsmysql.blogspot.com/

The dates for the all the sessions:

* 27th March: Part 1 – High Availability and Scalability Architectures
* 19th April: Part 2 – Advanced Scalability Solutions
* 2nd May: Part 3 – MySQL Enterprise To Control Mission Critical Online Services
* 23rd May: Part 4 – 99.999% High Availability solutions
* 13th June: Part 5 – MySQL Enterprise performance and benchmarking
* 27th June: Part 6 – Advanced HA solutions

Find all the material and documentation for past webinars at:
http://onlinesolutionsmysql.blogspot.com/2007/03/links-to-material-and-documentation.html

Feature: Hash tables explained.

http://www.sparknotes.com/cs/searching/hashtables/section1.html

http://www.cs.sunysb.edu/~algorith/lectures-good/node7.html (search for “Hash Tables” on the page)

Feedback:

Email podcast@technocation.org

call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369

use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Or use the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum

In this episode we tackle what a hash looks like in terms of a data structure, doctor cough in preparation for next episode’s discussion on the difference between hashes and btree indexes, ailment illness and what kind of indexes are good for what kind of optimizations.

Show Notes:
Direct play this episode at:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-17%3A-hashing-it-out-0

Download all podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

Subscribe to the podcast at:
http://feeds.feedburner.com/oursql

News:
MySQL Connector/NET 5.1.1 released:
this site guid,a161d719-a554-4f01-8cd5-7b45fcb7264d.aspx”>http://tinyurl.com/23a9ax

Download the new Connector/NET version:
http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/connector/net/5.1.html

MySQL 5.0.x security vulnerability:
http://bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=27513
Solution: upgrade to 5.0.40. This bug is not known to affect major versions 3 or 4.

Learning Resource:

http://onlinesolutionsmysql.blogspot.com/

The dates for the all the sessions:

* 27th March: Part 1 – High Availability and Scalability Architectures
* 19th April: Part 2 – Advanced Scalability Solutions
* 2nd May: Part 3 – MySQL Enterprise To Control Mission Critical Online Services
* 23rd May: Part 4 – 99.999% High Availability solutions
* 13th June: Part 5 – MySQL Enterprise performance and benchmarking
* 27th June: Part 6 – Advanced HA solutions

Find all the material and documentation for past webinars at:
http://onlinesolutionsmysql.blogspot.com/2007/03/links-to-material-and-documentation.html

Feature: Hash tables explained.

http://www.sparknotes.com/cs/searching/hashtables/section1.html

http://www.cs.sunysb.edu/~algorith/lectures-good/node7.html (search for “Hash Tables” on the page)

Feedback:

Email podcast@technocation.org

call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369

use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Or use the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum

So, buy information pills this is me:

Special thanx to Colin Charles for taking the picture and linking to it from his blog.

Notice that in addition to my photogenic qualities as well as the bags under my eyes, ambulance that I’m wearing an incredibly geeky necklace.

Yes, it’s true. I bought a white gold dolphin to wear around my neck, because I am THAT much of a MySQL geek.
So, order no rx the open source community/mentality/legacy/mindset tends to be attached to the idea:

“Free as in beer” — for comparison’s sake, search another meaning could be, order “free as in speech”.

Wikipedia has a good explanation of this, making “free as in beer” equivalent to “gratis,” meaning “free of cost.” Whereas “free as in speech” is equivalent to “libre,” free of restrictons.

Now, I understand why some things cost no money but are restricted. I also understand why some things cost no money and are not restricted. I do not have a particular religion either way, I think each product’s business model can be different.

So I’ll present a third concept: “Free as in water.”

Water is a privilege. In many places, we turn a handle and clear, potable, disease-free water comes out. We can drink it, we can wash ourselves with it, and we can luxuriate in it, as in a bath. However, many people in those places take it for granted that clean, potable, disease-free water will always come out when that handle is turned. Water is a precious commodity, though very often not treated as such. Many of us in the first world have not experienced how precious water is, as have those in the third world (“developing world” is the politically correct term these days).

I was reading randomly the other day, and came across a blog post where someone asked, “should water be free in a restaurant?”

There were a few repeated responses:

1) No, water should not be free in a restaurant. The water does actually cost money, and owners of properties typically pay a water bill.
2) No, water should not be free in a restaurant. While the water may be “free”, the glass is not, and neither is the waitstaff who bring you the glass and refill the water.
3) Yes, water should be free in a restaurant. The amount of water used does not cost that much, and the waitstaff is there anyway, so do not cost more.
4) Yes, water should be free in a restaurant. It puts me off when water is not, and I do not go back to those restaurants.

As I was reading, I immediately thought of open source business models. Because open source is, at its core, “free as in water”. The product is the water — whether it’s server-side software like Apache or MySQL, desktop software (aka “freeware”), an operating system such as Linux, or programming software such as PHP, Ruby or Perl. Much like water in a restaurant, as compared to other drinks, the cost is negligible. For instance, the cost of water compared to the cost of a soft drink is much less in most places.

Similarly, the monetary cost of MySQL compared to Oracle, or the cost of Linux compared to Microsoft, is much less.

Should all software be free? Certainly, I don’t think everything on a drink menu should be free. Oracle and Microsoft have a lot of overhead, and at the end of the day families need to be fed. Much like in a restaurant, though, open source software is the result of one or more folks doing work. Some of that work is programmatic, and yes, like water to soda, the programmatic cost is often less than the programmatic cost of the commercial entities. However, the waitstaff is analogous to support. Why is it that nobody thinks “free refills on drinks” is a ploy to get a bigger tip for waitstaff, yet many people think offering a free product with for-pay support means that the product is shoddy and of course you will need support?

That clean glass your water comes in is equivalent to QA. And yes, it’s not perfect — occasionally we find a spot of lipstick on the glass from a previous customer, and send the glass back.

So I believe the open source legacy should be that it is “free as in water” — it should be ubiquitous, though we should treasure it because it is truly valuable and if it did become rare, we would lose a lot of quality of life.

Nobody thinks “If you give away free water, nobody will ever buy a drink!” Yes, free water is a bit disruptive, but there will always be folks that use SQL Server, with it’s fabulous data analytics, and Oracle, with its long history and name recognition — just as there will always be folks willing to pay US $10 for an alcoholic drink. It’s not that someone paying $10 for a drink, or $5 for a beer, or even $2 for a soda is dumb because they could have just had water for free. It’s that sometimes you need water, and other times you want a $10 drink.

Now, MySQL has the potential to turn water into wine, and in that case, it’s even more disruptive…….

So, thoughts on the “free as in water” concept?
So, order no rx the open source community/mentality/legacy/mindset tends to be attached to the idea:

“Free as in beer” — for comparison’s sake, search another meaning could be, order “free as in speech”.

Wikipedia has a good explanation of this, making “free as in beer” equivalent to “gratis,” meaning “free of cost.” Whereas “free as in speech” is equivalent to “libre,” free of restrictons.

Now, I understand why some things cost no money but are restricted. I also understand why some things cost no money and are not restricted. I do not have a particular religion either way, I think each product’s business model can be different.

So I’ll present a third concept: “Free as in water.”

Water is a privilege. In many places, we turn a handle and clear, potable, disease-free water comes out. We can drink it, we can wash ourselves with it, and we can luxuriate in it, as in a bath. However, many people in those places take it for granted that clean, potable, disease-free water will always come out when that handle is turned. Water is a precious commodity, though very often not treated as such. Many of us in the first world have not experienced how precious water is, as have those in the third world (“developing world” is the politically correct term these days).

I was reading randomly the other day, and came across a blog post where someone asked, “should water be free in a restaurant?”

There were a few repeated responses:

1) No, water should not be free in a restaurant. The water does actually cost money, and owners of properties typically pay a water bill.
2) No, water should not be free in a restaurant. While the water may be “free”, the glass is not, and neither is the waitstaff who bring you the glass and refill the water.
3) Yes, water should be free in a restaurant. The amount of water used does not cost that much, and the waitstaff is there anyway, so do not cost more.
4) Yes, water should be free in a restaurant. It puts me off when water is not, and I do not go back to those restaurants.

As I was reading, I immediately thought of open source business models. Because open source is, at its core, “free as in water”. The product is the water — whether it’s server-side software like Apache or MySQL, desktop software (aka “freeware”), an operating system such as Linux, or programming software such as PHP, Ruby or Perl. Much like water in a restaurant, as compared to other drinks, the cost is negligible. For instance, the cost of water compared to the cost of a soft drink is much less in most places.

Similarly, the monetary cost of MySQL compared to Oracle, or the cost of Linux compared to Microsoft, is much less.

Should all software be free? Certainly, I don’t think everything on a drink menu should be free. Oracle and Microsoft have a lot of overhead, and at the end of the day families need to be fed. Much like in a restaurant, though, open source software is the result of one or more folks doing work. Some of that work is programmatic, and yes, like water to soda, the programmatic cost is often less than the programmatic cost of the commercial entities. However, the waitstaff is analogous to support. Why is it that nobody thinks “free refills on drinks” is a ploy to get a bigger tip for waitstaff, yet many people think offering a free product with for-pay support means that the product is shoddy and of course you will need support?

That clean glass your water comes in is equivalent to QA. And yes, it’s not perfect — occasionally we find a spot of lipstick on the glass from a previous customer, and send the glass back.

So I believe the open source legacy should be that it is “free as in water” — it should be ubiquitous, though we should treasure it because it is truly valuable and if it did become rare, we would lose a lot of quality of life.

Nobody thinks “If you give away free water, nobody will ever buy a drink!” Yes, free water is a bit disruptive, but there will always be folks that use SQL Server, with it’s fabulous data analytics, and Oracle, with its long history and name recognition — just as there will always be folks willing to pay US $10 for an alcoholic drink. It’s not that someone paying $10 for a drink, or $5 for a beer, or even $2 for a soda is dumb because they could have just had water for free. It’s that sometimes you need water, and other times you want a $10 drink.

Now, MySQL has the potential to turn water into wine, and in that case, it’s even more disruptive…….

So, thoughts on the “free as in water” concept?
In hindsight, ed it should have been obvious that open source software engineering would work because great people self-select, tablets nothing is a trade secret, and the world is a very big place.
Gary Whizin, as interviewed by Matt Asay, http://planetmysql.org/entry.php?id=8058
So, order no rx the open source community/mentality/legacy/mindset tends to be attached to the idea:

“Free as in beer” — for comparison’s sake, search another meaning could be, order “free as in speech”.

Wikipedia has a good explanation of this, making “free as in beer” equivalent to “gratis,” meaning “free of cost.” Whereas “free as in speech” is equivalent to “libre,” free of restrictons.

Now, I understand why some things cost no money but are restricted. I also understand why some things cost no money and are not restricted. I do not have a particular religion either way, I think each product’s business model can be different.

So I’ll present a third concept: “Free as in water.”

Water is a privilege. In many places, we turn a handle and clear, potable, disease-free water comes out. We can drink it, we can wash ourselves with it, and we can luxuriate in it, as in a bath. However, many people in those places take it for granted that clean, potable, disease-free water will always come out when that handle is turned. Water is a precious commodity, though very often not treated as such. Many of us in the first world have not experienced how precious water is, as have those in the third world (“developing world” is the politically correct term these days).

I was reading randomly the other day, and came across a blog post where someone asked, “should water be free in a restaurant?”

There were a few repeated responses:

1) No, water should not be free in a restaurant. The water does actually cost money, and owners of properties typically pay a water bill.
2) No, water should not be free in a restaurant. While the water may be “free”, the glass is not, and neither is the waitstaff who bring you the glass and refill the water.
3) Yes, water should be free in a restaurant. The amount of water used does not cost that much, and the waitstaff is there anyway, so do not cost more.
4) Yes, water should be free in a restaurant. It puts me off when water is not, and I do not go back to those restaurants.

As I was reading, I immediately thought of open source business models. Because open source is, at its core, “free as in water”. The product is the water — whether it’s server-side software like Apache or MySQL, desktop software (aka “freeware”), an operating system such as Linux, or programming software such as PHP, Ruby or Perl. Much like water in a restaurant, as compared to other drinks, the cost is negligible. For instance, the cost of water compared to the cost of a soft drink is much less in most places.

Similarly, the monetary cost of MySQL compared to Oracle, or the cost of Linux compared to Microsoft, is much less.

Should all software be free? Certainly, I don’t think everything on a drink menu should be free. Oracle and Microsoft have a lot of overhead, and at the end of the day families need to be fed. Much like in a restaurant, though, open source software is the result of one or more folks doing work. Some of that work is programmatic, and yes, like water to soda, the programmatic cost is often less than the programmatic cost of the commercial entities. However, the waitstaff is analogous to support. Why is it that nobody thinks “free refills on drinks” is a ploy to get a bigger tip for waitstaff, yet many people think offering a free product with for-pay support means that the product is shoddy and of course you will need support?

That clean glass your water comes in is equivalent to QA. And yes, it’s not perfect — occasionally we find a spot of lipstick on the glass from a previous customer, and send the glass back.

So I believe the open source legacy should be that it is “free as in water” — it should be ubiquitous, though we should treasure it because it is truly valuable and if it did become rare, we would lose a lot of quality of life.

Nobody thinks “If you give away free water, nobody will ever buy a drink!” Yes, free water is a bit disruptive, but there will always be folks that use SQL Server, with it’s fabulous data analytics, and Oracle, with its long history and name recognition — just as there will always be folks willing to pay US $10 for an alcoholic drink. It’s not that someone paying $10 for a drink, or $5 for a beer, or even $2 for a soda is dumb because they could have just had water for free. It’s that sometimes you need water, and other times you want a $10 drink.

Now, MySQL has the potential to turn water into wine, and in that case, it’s even more disruptive…….

So, thoughts on the “free as in water” concept?
In hindsight, ed it should have been obvious that open source software engineering would work because great people self-select, tablets nothing is a trade secret, and the world is a very big place.
Gary Whizin, as interviewed by Matt Asay, http://planetmysql.org/entry.php?id=8058
In hindsight, visit it should have been obvious that open source software engineering would work because great people self-select, nothing is a trade secret, and the world is a very big place.
Gary Whizin, as interviewed by Matt Asay, http://planetmysql.org/entry.php?id=8058
So, order no rx the open source community/mentality/legacy/mindset tends to be attached to the idea:

“Free as in beer” — for comparison’s sake, search another meaning could be, order “free as in speech”.

Wikipedia has a good explanation of this, making “free as in beer” equivalent to “gratis,” meaning “free of cost.” Whereas “free as in speech” is equivalent to “libre,” free of restrictons.

Now, I understand why some things cost no money but are restricted. I also understand why some things cost no money and are not restricted. I do not have a particular religion either way, I think each product’s business model can be different.

So I’ll present a third concept: “Free as in water.”

Water is a privilege. In many places, we turn a handle and clear, potable, disease-free water comes out. We can drink it, we can wash ourselves with it, and we can luxuriate in it, as in a bath. However, many people in those places take it for granted that clean, potable, disease-free water will always come out when that handle is turned. Water is a precious commodity, though very often not treated as such. Many of us in the first world have not experienced how precious water is, as have those in the third world (“developing world” is the politically correct term these days).

I was reading randomly the other day, and came across a blog post where someone asked, “should water be free in a restaurant?”

There were a few repeated responses:

1) No, water should not be free in a restaurant. The water does actually cost money, and owners of properties typically pay a water bill.
2) No, water should not be free in a restaurant. While the water may be “free”, the glass is not, and neither is the waitstaff who bring you the glass and refill the water.
3) Yes, water should be free in a restaurant. The amount of water used does not cost that much, and the waitstaff is there anyway, so do not cost more.
4) Yes, water should be free in a restaurant. It puts me off when water is not, and I do not go back to those restaurants.

As I was reading, I immediately thought of open source business models. Because open source is, at its core, “free as in water”. The product is the water — whether it’s server-side software like Apache or MySQL, desktop software (aka “freeware”), an operating system such as Linux, or programming software such as PHP, Ruby or Perl. Much like water in a restaurant, as compared to other drinks, the cost is negligible. For instance, the cost of water compared to the cost of a soft drink is much less in most places.

Similarly, the monetary cost of MySQL compared to Oracle, or the cost of Linux compared to Microsoft, is much less.

Should all software be free? Certainly, I don’t think everything on a drink menu should be free. Oracle and Microsoft have a lot of overhead, and at the end of the day families need to be fed. Much like in a restaurant, though, open source software is the result of one or more folks doing work. Some of that work is programmatic, and yes, like water to soda, the programmatic cost is often less than the programmatic cost of the commercial entities. However, the waitstaff is analogous to support. Why is it that nobody thinks “free refills on drinks” is a ploy to get a bigger tip for waitstaff, yet many people think offering a free product with for-pay support means that the product is shoddy and of course you will need support?

That clean glass your water comes in is equivalent to QA. And yes, it’s not perfect — occasionally we find a spot of lipstick on the glass from a previous customer, and send the glass back.

So I believe the open source legacy should be that it is “free as in water” — it should be ubiquitous, though we should treasure it because it is truly valuable and if it did become rare, we would lose a lot of quality of life.

Nobody thinks “If you give away free water, nobody will ever buy a drink!” Yes, free water is a bit disruptive, but there will always be folks that use SQL Server, with it’s fabulous data analytics, and Oracle, with its long history and name recognition — just as there will always be folks willing to pay US $10 for an alcoholic drink. It’s not that someone paying $10 for a drink, or $5 for a beer, or even $2 for a soda is dumb because they could have just had water for free. It’s that sometimes you need water, and other times you want a $10 drink.

Now, MySQL has the potential to turn water into wine, and in that case, it’s even more disruptive…….

So, thoughts on the “free as in water” concept?
In hindsight, ed it should have been obvious that open source software engineering would work because great people self-select, tablets nothing is a trade secret, and the world is a very big place.
Gary Whizin, as interviewed by Matt Asay, http://planetmysql.org/entry.php?id=8058
In hindsight, visit it should have been obvious that open source software engineering would work because great people self-select, nothing is a trade secret, and the world is a very big place.
Gary Whizin, as interviewed by Matt Asay, http://planetmysql.org/entry.php?id=8058
As the 2007 Community Advocate of the Year, viagra dosage I’m taking the “MySQL 5 Wishes” meme and changing it a bit. I hope y’all don’t mind:

1) Everyone has a different level of familiarity. The community does well with this when writing articles, discount for instance cross-referencing older articles, linking to documentation, the MySQL Forge, etc. Not much background information other than “MySQL usage” is assumed.

However, where we fall down is when we aggregate some writings and call it documentation. The worst form of this is a tool that grows organically, from “look, here’s a script!” to a full-blown tool/patch/add-on. Sourceforge stinks for trying to make documentation, so most folks just link to their posts tagged “mytool” or whatever the name is.

Using some marketing skills would be wonderful — make a page for folks who have never seen one post about it. Voila, you get your code going from something that people only learn when someone else tells them, to something folks wind up getting as a result of a search.

2) Along those lines, MySQL provides us with some great tools that we rarely use. When was the last time you linked your presentation to the MySQL Forge Wiki at http://forge.mysql.com/wiki/Main_Page? It took me a long time to make Technocation’s MySQL 2007 Conference Video page at http://technocation.org/content/2007-mysql-user-conference-and-expo-presentations-and-videos — Even after all the video was edited, I had to make the page.

How much easier would it have been if the descriptions, slides, handouts, video and audio were all available in one place? Obviously we can’t hack on the O’Reilly site, but there’s nothing to say that we can’t make a wiki site with everything about a presentation in one place — including links to everyone’s notes! Make it so that 5 years from now a person learning MySQL can find what they need, when they don’t have the same time/date context that we do.

3) Use (and appreciate) what we have. We have great software, sure. But we also have a company full of folks willing to talk to us. We can complain about the fact that even simple patches from non-employees take several months or a year or so to get into the code, because of existing coding conventions, etc. We can be annoyed that we have to download 7 addons for our software, but instead of saying MySQL should offer them for download in the same package (which of course they should, all the code should integrate nicely, and we should be able to turn on features we want and turn off or not use those we don’t)…….

….we can help that by making a centralized repository of MySQL addons. Run by the community, for the community. On the forge. At the very least we can make an index page of the neat tools we’ve created or found for MySQL and categorize them. Think of how plugins for software such as Firefox have repositories.

4) Volunteer unexpectedly. Got a presentation that didn’t make the cut for the 2007 MySQL Users Conference? Offer to present it at a local user group. Don’t have a local user group? Record the presentation as a lecture and post it online. Alternatively, make a local user group. Do what you’re mostly comfortable with — don’t always stay in your comfort zone, push it a little. Maybe it means volunteering to help the MySQL documentation get a bit better. Contact someone you know in MySQL (or just put the word out in a blog post) that you’d like to help _________ get better, and you’re sure to find a few takers.

5) Contribute! OK, many already do this at http://www.planetmysql.org. But consider contributing to:

Comments are closed.