Teaching Thinking Patterns

The MySQL She-BA

The MySQL She-BA

(The Executive Summary: I left my job last week, health and I start working at The Pythian Group on Monday. Go to their website if you’d like to work with me, sildenafil or with people just as knowledgeable as me.)

I get inquiries all the time about consulting. Folks are madly searching for experienced MySQL DBAs. The lure of a new environment is always tempting, medicine however, working for any one environment has its quirks. In October I realized I was coming up on having worked 2 years at my job. That’s not a very long period of time, but it certainly was long enough for me to learn the environment and get stuck in a rut — mostly my rut was doing more systems work than database work.

I looked around for other places of work, and had a wonderful interview at an awesome company to boot. However, they were also a product company, and I’d decided that I wanted to move to a service company. That is, a company that provides database services to a wide variety of environments. A company that sells products still usually has one environment, or at least one environment that I would work in. With a service-oriented company, such as a consulting firm, I can gain the experience of many environments and many setups.

Learning from my co-workers is important too — too many shops have only 1 or 2 MySQL DBA positions, which leaves me with 1 or 0 MySQL colleagues at work. Being the big fish in a small pond has its advantages, but it’s also too easy to get caught in my own ways of doing things and not see another side of things.

So, I thought about where I’d want to work. There are many great MySQL consulting firms out there. I looked at the ones I knew about — most of the ones run by Planet MySQLers I ruled out because either I didn’t have the right skillset (I’m not a programmer, C or otherwise!) or because I thought there might be personality conflicts, or because I’d have to move.

That was a big one — having to move. I have to stay in the Boston area, at least for now. My husband and I discussed things, and we’re not willing to move right now. Also, I hate too much travel. Anything more than 10% really wears me down. And that, sadly, put MySQL’s own consulting out of the running. I just cannot travel that much.

So where does that leave me? Well, I called up The Pythian Group and we had a few hours of great phone conversations.

Next week, I fly to Ottawa for training! There will be a Boston office opening, but that’s after I finish 2-3 weeks of training.

I’m very excited to learn more about how The Pythian Group operates, as well as getting down and dirty with different environments, and solving lots of problems.

The MySQL She-BA

(The Executive Summary: I left my job last week, health and I start working at The Pythian Group on Monday. Go to their website if you’d like to work with me, sildenafil or with people just as knowledgeable as me.)

I get inquiries all the time about consulting. Folks are madly searching for experienced MySQL DBAs. The lure of a new environment is always tempting, medicine however, working for any one environment has its quirks. In October I realized I was coming up on having worked 2 years at my job. That’s not a very long period of time, but it certainly was long enough for me to learn the environment and get stuck in a rut — mostly my rut was doing more systems work than database work.

I looked around for other places of work, and had a wonderful interview at an awesome company to boot. However, they were also a product company, and I’d decided that I wanted to move to a service company. That is, a company that provides database services to a wide variety of environments. A company that sells products still usually has one environment, or at least one environment that I would work in. With a service-oriented company, such as a consulting firm, I can gain the experience of many environments and many setups.

Learning from my co-workers is important too — too many shops have only 1 or 2 MySQL DBA positions, which leaves me with 1 or 0 MySQL colleagues at work. Being the big fish in a small pond has its advantages, but it’s also too easy to get caught in my own ways of doing things and not see another side of things.

So, I thought about where I’d want to work. There are many great MySQL consulting firms out there. I looked at the ones I knew about — most of the ones run by Planet MySQLers I ruled out because either I didn’t have the right skillset (I’m not a programmer, C or otherwise!) or because I thought there might be personality conflicts, or because I’d have to move.

That was a big one — having to move. I have to stay in the Boston area, at least for now. My husband and I discussed things, and we’re not willing to move right now. Also, I hate too much travel. Anything more than 10% really wears me down. And that, sadly, put MySQL’s own consulting out of the running. I just cannot travel that much.

So where does that leave me? Well, I called up The Pythian Group and we had a few hours of great phone conversations.

Next week, I fly to Ottawa for training! There will be a Boston office opening, but that’s after I finish 2-3 weeks of training.

I’m very excited to learn more about how The Pythian Group operates, as well as getting down and dirty with different environments, and solving lots of problems.

and talks a little bit about the new features, cialis 40mg server variables, recipe and what you need to know when upgrading to MySQL 5.1.

The software used is GoToWebinar (formerly GoToMeeting), information pills so you will need to install that software. To register, use the links on the IOUG MySQL Upgrade Webinar Series page.

The complete list of webinars in the MySQL Upgrade Series is:
* MySQL 5.1: Why and How to Upgrade
Sheeri Cabral, The Pythian Group
Tuesday, July 27, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. CT (GMT-5)

* MySQL Upgrades With No Downtime
Sean Hull, Heavyweight Internet Group
Wednesday, July 28, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. CT (GMT-5)

* MySQL Upgrade Best Practices
Matt Yonkovit, Percona
Thursday, July 29, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. CT (GMT-5)

(note, I am not sure if it is free for everyone or just free for IOUG members; my apologies if it is the latter)

The MySQL She-BA

(The Executive Summary: I left my job last week, health and I start working at The Pythian Group on Monday. Go to their website if you’d like to work with me, sildenafil or with people just as knowledgeable as me.)

I get inquiries all the time about consulting. Folks are madly searching for experienced MySQL DBAs. The lure of a new environment is always tempting, medicine however, working for any one environment has its quirks. In October I realized I was coming up on having worked 2 years at my job. That’s not a very long period of time, but it certainly was long enough for me to learn the environment and get stuck in a rut — mostly my rut was doing more systems work than database work.

I looked around for other places of work, and had a wonderful interview at an awesome company to boot. However, they were also a product company, and I’d decided that I wanted to move to a service company. That is, a company that provides database services to a wide variety of environments. A company that sells products still usually has one environment, or at least one environment that I would work in. With a service-oriented company, such as a consulting firm, I can gain the experience of many environments and many setups.

Learning from my co-workers is important too — too many shops have only 1 or 2 MySQL DBA positions, which leaves me with 1 or 0 MySQL colleagues at work. Being the big fish in a small pond has its advantages, but it’s also too easy to get caught in my own ways of doing things and not see another side of things.

So, I thought about where I’d want to work. There are many great MySQL consulting firms out there. I looked at the ones I knew about — most of the ones run by Planet MySQLers I ruled out because either I didn’t have the right skillset (I’m not a programmer, C or otherwise!) or because I thought there might be personality conflicts, or because I’d have to move.

That was a big one — having to move. I have to stay in the Boston area, at least for now. My husband and I discussed things, and we’re not willing to move right now. Also, I hate too much travel. Anything more than 10% really wears me down. And that, sadly, put MySQL’s own consulting out of the running. I just cannot travel that much.

So where does that leave me? Well, I called up The Pythian Group and we had a few hours of great phone conversations.

Next week, I fly to Ottawa for training! There will be a Boston office opening, but that’s after I finish 2-3 weeks of training.

I’m very excited to learn more about how The Pythian Group operates, as well as getting down and dirty with different environments, and solving lots of problems.

and talks a little bit about the new features, cialis 40mg server variables, recipe and what you need to know when upgrading to MySQL 5.1.

The software used is GoToWebinar (formerly GoToMeeting), information pills so you will need to install that software. To register, use the links on the IOUG MySQL Upgrade Webinar Series page.

The complete list of webinars in the MySQL Upgrade Series is:
* MySQL 5.1: Why and How to Upgrade
Sheeri Cabral, The Pythian Group
Tuesday, July 27, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. CT (GMT-5)

* MySQL Upgrades With No Downtime
Sean Hull, Heavyweight Internet Group
Wednesday, July 28, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. CT (GMT-5)

* MySQL Upgrade Best Practices
Matt Yonkovit, Percona
Thursday, July 29, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. CT (GMT-5)

(note, I am not sure if it is free for everyone or just free for IOUG members; my apologies if it is the latter)

http://www.oracle.com/openworld/2007/appreciation.html

Now, unhealthy Billy Joel is one of my all-time favorite pop musicians. I saw him in concert and nosebleed seats at the Boston Garden cost me USD $100 per ticket, doctor and I bought 4 tickets (my twin brother is a die-hard Billy Joel fan, they were a holiday surprise 2 years ago!)

Billy Joel regularly sells out sports arenas. I can only imagine how much Oracle paid to have a concert with him.

And don’t get me wrong, the rest of the list is also stellar. Which only adds to my disbelief.

MySQL shows customer appreciation by not grossly overcharging.

MySQL: Because you’re smart enough to buy your own damn concert tickets.

The MySQL She-BA

(The Executive Summary: I left my job last week, health and I start working at The Pythian Group on Monday. Go to their website if you’d like to work with me, sildenafil or with people just as knowledgeable as me.)

I get inquiries all the time about consulting. Folks are madly searching for experienced MySQL DBAs. The lure of a new environment is always tempting, medicine however, working for any one environment has its quirks. In October I realized I was coming up on having worked 2 years at my job. That’s not a very long period of time, but it certainly was long enough for me to learn the environment and get stuck in a rut — mostly my rut was doing more systems work than database work.

I looked around for other places of work, and had a wonderful interview at an awesome company to boot. However, they were also a product company, and I’d decided that I wanted to move to a service company. That is, a company that provides database services to a wide variety of environments. A company that sells products still usually has one environment, or at least one environment that I would work in. With a service-oriented company, such as a consulting firm, I can gain the experience of many environments and many setups.

Learning from my co-workers is important too — too many shops have only 1 or 2 MySQL DBA positions, which leaves me with 1 or 0 MySQL colleagues at work. Being the big fish in a small pond has its advantages, but it’s also too easy to get caught in my own ways of doing things and not see another side of things.

So, I thought about where I’d want to work. There are many great MySQL consulting firms out there. I looked at the ones I knew about — most of the ones run by Planet MySQLers I ruled out because either I didn’t have the right skillset (I’m not a programmer, C or otherwise!) or because I thought there might be personality conflicts, or because I’d have to move.

That was a big one — having to move. I have to stay in the Boston area, at least for now. My husband and I discussed things, and we’re not willing to move right now. Also, I hate too much travel. Anything more than 10% really wears me down. And that, sadly, put MySQL’s own consulting out of the running. I just cannot travel that much.

So where does that leave me? Well, I called up The Pythian Group and we had a few hours of great phone conversations.

Next week, I fly to Ottawa for training! There will be a Boston office opening, but that’s after I finish 2-3 weeks of training.

I’m very excited to learn more about how The Pythian Group operates, as well as getting down and dirty with different environments, and solving lots of problems.

and talks a little bit about the new features, cialis 40mg server variables, recipe and what you need to know when upgrading to MySQL 5.1.

The software used is GoToWebinar (formerly GoToMeeting), information pills so you will need to install that software. To register, use the links on the IOUG MySQL Upgrade Webinar Series page.

The complete list of webinars in the MySQL Upgrade Series is:
* MySQL 5.1: Why and How to Upgrade
Sheeri Cabral, The Pythian Group
Tuesday, July 27, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. CT (GMT-5)

* MySQL Upgrades With No Downtime
Sean Hull, Heavyweight Internet Group
Wednesday, July 28, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. CT (GMT-5)

* MySQL Upgrade Best Practices
Matt Yonkovit, Percona
Thursday, July 29, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. CT (GMT-5)

(note, I am not sure if it is free for everyone or just free for IOUG members; my apologies if it is the latter)

http://www.oracle.com/openworld/2007/appreciation.html

Now, unhealthy Billy Joel is one of my all-time favorite pop musicians. I saw him in concert and nosebleed seats at the Boston Garden cost me USD $100 per ticket, doctor and I bought 4 tickets (my twin brother is a die-hard Billy Joel fan, they were a holiday surprise 2 years ago!)

Billy Joel regularly sells out sports arenas. I can only imagine how much Oracle paid to have a concert with him.

And don’t get me wrong, the rest of the list is also stellar. Which only adds to my disbelief.

MySQL shows customer appreciation by not grossly overcharging.

MySQL: Because you’re smart enough to buy your own damn concert tickets.
I think the briefest way to sum up the difference between a good developer mindset and a good sysadmin mindset is “a good developer thinks, approved ‘how will this work?’ and works accordingly. A good sysadmin thinks, malady ‘how will this break?’ and works accordingly.”

Developers think in terms of “edge cases” and “off by 1” errors, for sale which start from a default of things working. This is good as a design skill; developers need to think algorithmically, pondering a main way of something functioning and then dealing with anomalies.

However, sysadmins tend to install systems and maintain them with scripts, as opposed to building new software — usually. Sysadmins deal with systems when anomalies happen, so they must have a mindset of “how will this break?” vis-a-vis — “how will this break and how can I be notified of the breakage before my boss/the customers call?” which leads to “what if the notification system breaks?”

Now, a DBA leads a double life. In fact, DBA has come to mean “database professional”. There are plenty of folks who use DBA when in fact they’re great Database Programmers, who can code their way around any problem but haven’t touched a config file and never have GRANTed anyone access. On the other end of the spectrum are folks like me, who fiddle with stored procedures but are great at administration.

I’ve always thought that “database professionals” bridged the gap between Systems and Development, almost by sheer need. I wonder if that’s true for any “major application professional” such as an Apache/Tomcat/Resin/Jboss administrator.

What do you think about the different qualities of Sysadmins, DBAs and Developers?

The MySQL She-BA

(The Executive Summary: I left my job last week, health and I start working at The Pythian Group on Monday. Go to their website if you’d like to work with me, sildenafil or with people just as knowledgeable as me.)

I get inquiries all the time about consulting. Folks are madly searching for experienced MySQL DBAs. The lure of a new environment is always tempting, medicine however, working for any one environment has its quirks. In October I realized I was coming up on having worked 2 years at my job. That’s not a very long period of time, but it certainly was long enough for me to learn the environment and get stuck in a rut — mostly my rut was doing more systems work than database work.

I looked around for other places of work, and had a wonderful interview at an awesome company to boot. However, they were also a product company, and I’d decided that I wanted to move to a service company. That is, a company that provides database services to a wide variety of environments. A company that sells products still usually has one environment, or at least one environment that I would work in. With a service-oriented company, such as a consulting firm, I can gain the experience of many environments and many setups.

Learning from my co-workers is important too — too many shops have only 1 or 2 MySQL DBA positions, which leaves me with 1 or 0 MySQL colleagues at work. Being the big fish in a small pond has its advantages, but it’s also too easy to get caught in my own ways of doing things and not see another side of things.

So, I thought about where I’d want to work. There are many great MySQL consulting firms out there. I looked at the ones I knew about — most of the ones run by Planet MySQLers I ruled out because either I didn’t have the right skillset (I’m not a programmer, C or otherwise!) or because I thought there might be personality conflicts, or because I’d have to move.

That was a big one — having to move. I have to stay in the Boston area, at least for now. My husband and I discussed things, and we’re not willing to move right now. Also, I hate too much travel. Anything more than 10% really wears me down. And that, sadly, put MySQL’s own consulting out of the running. I just cannot travel that much.

So where does that leave me? Well, I called up The Pythian Group and we had a few hours of great phone conversations.

Next week, I fly to Ottawa for training! There will be a Boston office opening, but that’s after I finish 2-3 weeks of training.

I’m very excited to learn more about how The Pythian Group operates, as well as getting down and dirty with different environments, and solving lots of problems.

and talks a little bit about the new features, cialis 40mg server variables, recipe and what you need to know when upgrading to MySQL 5.1.

The software used is GoToWebinar (formerly GoToMeeting), information pills so you will need to install that software. To register, use the links on the IOUG MySQL Upgrade Webinar Series page.

The complete list of webinars in the MySQL Upgrade Series is:
* MySQL 5.1: Why and How to Upgrade
Sheeri Cabral, The Pythian Group
Tuesday, July 27, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. CT (GMT-5)

* MySQL Upgrades With No Downtime
Sean Hull, Heavyweight Internet Group
Wednesday, July 28, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. CT (GMT-5)

* MySQL Upgrade Best Practices
Matt Yonkovit, Percona
Thursday, July 29, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. CT (GMT-5)

(note, I am not sure if it is free for everyone or just free for IOUG members; my apologies if it is the latter)

http://www.oracle.com/openworld/2007/appreciation.html

Now, unhealthy Billy Joel is one of my all-time favorite pop musicians. I saw him in concert and nosebleed seats at the Boston Garden cost me USD $100 per ticket, doctor and I bought 4 tickets (my twin brother is a die-hard Billy Joel fan, they were a holiday surprise 2 years ago!)

Billy Joel regularly sells out sports arenas. I can only imagine how much Oracle paid to have a concert with him.

And don’t get me wrong, the rest of the list is also stellar. Which only adds to my disbelief.

MySQL shows customer appreciation by not grossly overcharging.

MySQL: Because you’re smart enough to buy your own damn concert tickets.
I think the briefest way to sum up the difference between a good developer mindset and a good sysadmin mindset is “a good developer thinks, approved ‘how will this work?’ and works accordingly. A good sysadmin thinks, malady ‘how will this break?’ and works accordingly.”

Developers think in terms of “edge cases” and “off by 1” errors, for sale which start from a default of things working. This is good as a design skill; developers need to think algorithmically, pondering a main way of something functioning and then dealing with anomalies.

However, sysadmins tend to install systems and maintain them with scripts, as opposed to building new software — usually. Sysadmins deal with systems when anomalies happen, so they must have a mindset of “how will this break?” vis-a-vis — “how will this break and how can I be notified of the breakage before my boss/the customers call?” which leads to “what if the notification system breaks?”

Now, a DBA leads a double life. In fact, DBA has come to mean “database professional”. There are plenty of folks who use DBA when in fact they’re great Database Programmers, who can code their way around any problem but haven’t touched a config file and never have GRANTed anyone access. On the other end of the spectrum are folks like me, who fiddle with stored procedures but are great at administration.

I’ve always thought that “database professionals” bridged the gap between Systems and Development, almost by sheer need. I wonder if that’s true for any “major application professional” such as an Apache/Tomcat/Resin/Jboss administrator.

What do you think about the different qualities of Sysadmins, DBAs and Developers?

I have finally managed to watch and slightly edit the September 2007 Boston MySQL User Group presentation I did on the MySQL Proxy.

It’s geared towards beginners, diagnosis and has lots of examples, including explaining some of the examples that come bundled with the MySQL Proxy.

Direct Play

Download video (.wmv file, 612 Mb)
Download video (.wmv file, 76.10 Mb)

Enjoy!

Some resources:
Presentation Slides PowerPoint (ppt) or PDF or Flash (swf)

read more

The MySQL She-BA

(The Executive Summary: I left my job last week, health and I start working at The Pythian Group on Monday. Go to their website if you’d like to work with me, sildenafil or with people just as knowledgeable as me.)

I get inquiries all the time about consulting. Folks are madly searching for experienced MySQL DBAs. The lure of a new environment is always tempting, medicine however, working for any one environment has its quirks. In October I realized I was coming up on having worked 2 years at my job. That’s not a very long period of time, but it certainly was long enough for me to learn the environment and get stuck in a rut — mostly my rut was doing more systems work than database work.

I looked around for other places of work, and had a wonderful interview at an awesome company to boot. However, they were also a product company, and I’d decided that I wanted to move to a service company. That is, a company that provides database services to a wide variety of environments. A company that sells products still usually has one environment, or at least one environment that I would work in. With a service-oriented company, such as a consulting firm, I can gain the experience of many environments and many setups.

Learning from my co-workers is important too — too many shops have only 1 or 2 MySQL DBA positions, which leaves me with 1 or 0 MySQL colleagues at work. Being the big fish in a small pond has its advantages, but it’s also too easy to get caught in my own ways of doing things and not see another side of things.

So, I thought about where I’d want to work. There are many great MySQL consulting firms out there. I looked at the ones I knew about — most of the ones run by Planet MySQLers I ruled out because either I didn’t have the right skillset (I’m not a programmer, C or otherwise!) or because I thought there might be personality conflicts, or because I’d have to move.

That was a big one — having to move. I have to stay in the Boston area, at least for now. My husband and I discussed things, and we’re not willing to move right now. Also, I hate too much travel. Anything more than 10% really wears me down. And that, sadly, put MySQL’s own consulting out of the running. I just cannot travel that much.

So where does that leave me? Well, I called up The Pythian Group and we had a few hours of great phone conversations.

Next week, I fly to Ottawa for training! There will be a Boston office opening, but that’s after I finish 2-3 weeks of training.

I’m very excited to learn more about how The Pythian Group operates, as well as getting down and dirty with different environments, and solving lots of problems.

and talks a little bit about the new features, cialis 40mg server variables, recipe and what you need to know when upgrading to MySQL 5.1.

The software used is GoToWebinar (formerly GoToMeeting), information pills so you will need to install that software. To register, use the links on the IOUG MySQL Upgrade Webinar Series page.

The complete list of webinars in the MySQL Upgrade Series is:
* MySQL 5.1: Why and How to Upgrade
Sheeri Cabral, The Pythian Group
Tuesday, July 27, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. CT (GMT-5)

* MySQL Upgrades With No Downtime
Sean Hull, Heavyweight Internet Group
Wednesday, July 28, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. CT (GMT-5)

* MySQL Upgrade Best Practices
Matt Yonkovit, Percona
Thursday, July 29, 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. CT (GMT-5)

(note, I am not sure if it is free for everyone or just free for IOUG members; my apologies if it is the latter)

http://www.oracle.com/openworld/2007/appreciation.html

Now, unhealthy Billy Joel is one of my all-time favorite pop musicians. I saw him in concert and nosebleed seats at the Boston Garden cost me USD $100 per ticket, doctor and I bought 4 tickets (my twin brother is a die-hard Billy Joel fan, they were a holiday surprise 2 years ago!)

Billy Joel regularly sells out sports arenas. I can only imagine how much Oracle paid to have a concert with him.

And don’t get me wrong, the rest of the list is also stellar. Which only adds to my disbelief.

MySQL shows customer appreciation by not grossly overcharging.

MySQL: Because you’re smart enough to buy your own damn concert tickets.
I think the briefest way to sum up the difference between a good developer mindset and a good sysadmin mindset is “a good developer thinks, approved ‘how will this work?’ and works accordingly. A good sysadmin thinks, malady ‘how will this break?’ and works accordingly.”

Developers think in terms of “edge cases” and “off by 1” errors, for sale which start from a default of things working. This is good as a design skill; developers need to think algorithmically, pondering a main way of something functioning and then dealing with anomalies.

However, sysadmins tend to install systems and maintain them with scripts, as opposed to building new software — usually. Sysadmins deal with systems when anomalies happen, so they must have a mindset of “how will this break?” vis-a-vis — “how will this break and how can I be notified of the breakage before my boss/the customers call?” which leads to “what if the notification system breaks?”

Now, a DBA leads a double life. In fact, DBA has come to mean “database professional”. There are plenty of folks who use DBA when in fact they’re great Database Programmers, who can code their way around any problem but haven’t touched a config file and never have GRANTed anyone access. On the other end of the spectrum are folks like me, who fiddle with stored procedures but are great at administration.

I’ve always thought that “database professionals” bridged the gap between Systems and Development, almost by sheer need. I wonder if that’s true for any “major application professional” such as an Apache/Tomcat/Resin/Jboss administrator.

What do you think about the different qualities of Sysadmins, DBAs and Developers?

I have finally managed to watch and slightly edit the September 2007 Boston MySQL User Group presentation I did on the MySQL Proxy.

It’s geared towards beginners, diagnosis and has lots of examples, including explaining some of the examples that come bundled with the MySQL Proxy.

Direct Play

Download video (.wmv file, 612 Mb)
Download video (.wmv file, 76.10 Mb)

Enjoy!

Some resources:
Presentation Slides PowerPoint (ppt) or PDF or Flash (swf)

read more


This morning I was looking for something on Ohloh and realized I should “stack” maatkit. Since I couldn’t find “maatkit” nor “mysql toolkit” in Ohloh, erectile I created a new project for it at:

http://www.ohloh.net/projects/10083

If you’re on Ohloh, sildenafil stack it!

www.ohloh.net is a neat social networking tool for open source software. Instead of searching freeware lists, information pills search ohloh, and you can find reviews, # of people using the software, and direct links to download pages. My profile is at:

http://www.ohloh.net/accounts/8446http://www.ohloh.net/accounts/8446
and you can see my stack at:
http://www.ohloh.net/accounts/8446/stacks/default
How do you teach a thinking pattern? In my previous job I worked with a data analyst, drugs visit this site who was really good at thinking about how our data correlates among itself. He was good at the data analysis, good at thinking up relationships, and good at coming up with complex comparisons.

However, he wrote some pretty funky SQL. We had him take a course in basics of MySQL, and from time to time I’d take a gander in the slow query logs and pick a few queries and point out the good and bad things. Most of these are optimization tips, such as “Indexes don’t apply to columns when you’re applying a function to that column”.

But it’s hard to try to think outside of your own box, and even running EXPLAIN on every query won’t necessarily tell you how you can fix a query. The problem is that there’s no way to know if you have optimized the query as much as possible. Even experienced DBAs

I was often frustrated when repeating concepts — though I always took a different approach, since I find that if I have to repeat myself it means that it didn’t sink in with the way I said it before. But I know many people, myself included, have managed to learn how to think differently.

The question, I guess, is how do you help someone else think differently?

Comments are closed.