OurSQL Episode 10: How About Some Cache?

Dorsal Source has a list of where you can get MySQL binaries — official and unofficial — up at:

http://www.dorsalsource.org
Dorsal Source has a list of where you can get MySQL binaries — official and unofficial — up at:

http://www.dorsalsource.org
In this episode, angina I go over database normalization in general and explain 1st Normal Form (1NF) in depth.

Direct play episode 7 at:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-7%3A-what%2526%2523039%3Bs-it-be-normal%3F-1

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

Links:
MySQL binaries centralized repository: http://www.dorsalsource.org

SQLzoo

http://www.sqlzoo.net

Links about database normalization:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1NF

http://www.datamodel.org/NormalizationRules.html

http://dev.mysql.com/tech-resources/articles/intro-to-normalization.html

http://www.utexas.edu/its/windows/database/datamodeling/rm/rm7.html

Acknowledgements

http://www.technocation.org

http://music.podshow.com

http://www.russellwolff.com

http://www.smallfishadventures.com/Home.html “The Thank you song” — Smallfish

Feedback

If you have any feedback about this podcast, dosage or want to suggest topics to cover in future podcasts, physician please email

podcast@technocation.org

You can also:

Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369

Or use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Or use the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum
Dorsal Source has a list of where you can get MySQL binaries — official and unofficial — up at:

http://www.dorsalsource.org
In this episode, angina I go over database normalization in general and explain 1st Normal Form (1NF) in depth.

Direct play episode 7 at:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-7%3A-what%2526%2523039%3Bs-it-be-normal%3F-1

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

Links:
MySQL binaries centralized repository: http://www.dorsalsource.org

SQLzoo

http://www.sqlzoo.net

Links about database normalization:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1NF

http://www.datamodel.org/NormalizationRules.html

http://dev.mysql.com/tech-resources/articles/intro-to-normalization.html

http://www.utexas.edu/its/windows/database/datamodeling/rm/rm7.html

Acknowledgements

http://www.technocation.org

http://music.podshow.com

http://www.russellwolff.com

http://www.smallfishadventures.com/Home.html “The Thank you song” — Smallfish

Feedback

If you have any feedback about this podcast, dosage or want to suggest topics to cover in future podcasts, physician please email

podcast@technocation.org

You can also:

Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369

Or use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Or use the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum
Listener feedback:

MySQL will go public. Would you buy stock if you had the money? Why or why not?
Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369 (US phone number)

Use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Leave a message at the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum

Send an e-mail to podcast@technocation.org

Episode 8 Show Notes:
This episode’s feature is basic MySQL Security. Not only will we discuss what the basic security is, order but we’ll discuss the *why*s, not just the how’s.

Direct play this episode at:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-8%3A-basic-mysql-security-0

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

News
MySQL offers an unlimited number of Gold licenses per year for $40,000:
http://mysql.com/products/enterprise/unlimited.html
http://mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html

MySQL begins to talk about going public: http://www.businessreviewonline.com/os/archives/2007/01/mysql_set_to_jo.html

Learning Resource:
http://www.hackmysql.com

Feature — MySQL Security:
Bruce Scneier’s latest Crypto-Gram newsletter refers to an article where a person gets on an airplane, having bypassed all airport security via climbing a fence.
http://www.schneier.com/crypto-gram-0701.html
http://www.newsobserver.com/102/story/523482.html

Feedback
To leave a comment, suggestion, question or other feedback:

Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369 (US phone number)

Use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Leave a message at the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum

Send an e-mail to podcast@technocation.org

Acknowledgements/Sponsors
www.technocation.org
http://music.podshow.com
www.russellwolff.com
http://www.smallfishadventures.com/Home.html “The Thank you song” — Smallfish
Dorsal Source has a list of where you can get MySQL binaries — official and unofficial — up at:

http://www.dorsalsource.org
In this episode, angina I go over database normalization in general and explain 1st Normal Form (1NF) in depth.

Direct play episode 7 at:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-7%3A-what%2526%2523039%3Bs-it-be-normal%3F-1

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

Links:
MySQL binaries centralized repository: http://www.dorsalsource.org

SQLzoo

http://www.sqlzoo.net

Links about database normalization:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1NF

http://www.datamodel.org/NormalizationRules.html

http://dev.mysql.com/tech-resources/articles/intro-to-normalization.html

http://www.utexas.edu/its/windows/database/datamodeling/rm/rm7.html

Acknowledgements

http://www.technocation.org

http://music.podshow.com

http://www.russellwolff.com

http://www.smallfishadventures.com/Home.html “The Thank you song” — Smallfish

Feedback

If you have any feedback about this podcast, dosage or want to suggest topics to cover in future podcasts, physician please email

podcast@technocation.org

You can also:

Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369

Or use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Or use the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum
Listener feedback:

MySQL will go public. Would you buy stock if you had the money? Why or why not?
Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369 (US phone number)

Use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Leave a message at the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum

Send an e-mail to podcast@technocation.org

Episode 8 Show Notes:
This episode’s feature is basic MySQL Security. Not only will we discuss what the basic security is, order but we’ll discuss the *why*s, not just the how’s.

Direct play this episode at:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-8%3A-basic-mysql-security-0

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

News
MySQL offers an unlimited number of Gold licenses per year for $40,000:
http://mysql.com/products/enterprise/unlimited.html
http://mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html

MySQL begins to talk about going public: http://www.businessreviewonline.com/os/archives/2007/01/mysql_set_to_jo.html

Learning Resource:
http://www.hackmysql.com

Feature — MySQL Security:
Bruce Scneier’s latest Crypto-Gram newsletter refers to an article where a person gets on an airplane, having bypassed all airport security via climbing a fence.
http://www.schneier.com/crypto-gram-0701.html
http://www.newsobserver.com/102/story/523482.html

Feedback
To leave a comment, suggestion, question or other feedback:

Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369 (US phone number)

Use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Leave a message at the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum

Send an e-mail to podcast@technocation.org

Acknowledgements/Sponsors
www.technocation.org
http://music.podshow.com
www.russellwolff.com
http://www.smallfishadventures.com/Home.html “The Thank you song” — Smallfish
Thanx to Rich McIver for passing along this link:

http://www.businessintelligencelowdown.com/2007/02/top_10_largest_.html

I’m amused mostly because the article interchanges “database” with “data storage” — many of the sites have “digital documents” included in their count, oncologist and YouTube is in there completely with the amount of space their videos take up. But is all this stuff stored in databases? I do not think so. Anyone know for sure?
Dorsal Source has a list of where you can get MySQL binaries — official and unofficial — up at:

http://www.dorsalsource.org
In this episode, angina I go over database normalization in general and explain 1st Normal Form (1NF) in depth.

Direct play episode 7 at:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-7%3A-what%2526%2523039%3Bs-it-be-normal%3F-1

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

Links:
MySQL binaries centralized repository: http://www.dorsalsource.org

SQLzoo

http://www.sqlzoo.net

Links about database normalization:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1NF

http://www.datamodel.org/NormalizationRules.html

http://dev.mysql.com/tech-resources/articles/intro-to-normalization.html

http://www.utexas.edu/its/windows/database/datamodeling/rm/rm7.html

Acknowledgements

http://www.technocation.org

http://music.podshow.com

http://www.russellwolff.com

http://www.smallfishadventures.com/Home.html “The Thank you song” — Smallfish

Feedback

If you have any feedback about this podcast, dosage or want to suggest topics to cover in future podcasts, physician please email

podcast@technocation.org

You can also:

Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369

Or use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Or use the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum
Listener feedback:

MySQL will go public. Would you buy stock if you had the money? Why or why not?
Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369 (US phone number)

Use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Leave a message at the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum

Send an e-mail to podcast@technocation.org

Episode 8 Show Notes:
This episode’s feature is basic MySQL Security. Not only will we discuss what the basic security is, order but we’ll discuss the *why*s, not just the how’s.

Direct play this episode at:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-8%3A-basic-mysql-security-0

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

News
MySQL offers an unlimited number of Gold licenses per year for $40,000:
http://mysql.com/products/enterprise/unlimited.html
http://mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html

MySQL begins to talk about going public: http://www.businessreviewonline.com/os/archives/2007/01/mysql_set_to_jo.html

Learning Resource:
http://www.hackmysql.com

Feature — MySQL Security:
Bruce Scneier’s latest Crypto-Gram newsletter refers to an article where a person gets on an airplane, having bypassed all airport security via climbing a fence.
http://www.schneier.com/crypto-gram-0701.html
http://www.newsobserver.com/102/story/523482.html

Feedback
To leave a comment, suggestion, question or other feedback:

Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369 (US phone number)

Use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Leave a message at the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum

Send an e-mail to podcast@technocation.org

Acknowledgements/Sponsors
www.technocation.org
http://music.podshow.com
www.russellwolff.com
http://www.smallfishadventures.com/Home.html “The Thank you song” — Smallfish
Thanx to Rich McIver for passing along this link:

http://www.businessintelligencelowdown.com/2007/02/top_10_largest_.html

I’m amused mostly because the article interchanges “database” with “data storage” — many of the sites have “digital documents” included in their count, oncologist and YouTube is in there completely with the amount of space their videos take up. But is all this stuff stored in databases? I do not think so. Anyone know for sure?
http://www.regdeveloper.co.uk/2006/07/18/multivalued_datatypes_access/

This is an interesting read — it would be awesome if MySQL just used the “SET” or “ENUM” data types to be a placeholder for a join table, doctor that it would create automatically for you. Of course, that’s a new level of functionality — MySQL does not implicitly create permanent tables with any commands. But it would be neat.
Dorsal Source has a list of where you can get MySQL binaries — official and unofficial — up at:

http://www.dorsalsource.org
In this episode, angina I go over database normalization in general and explain 1st Normal Form (1NF) in depth.

Direct play episode 7 at:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-7%3A-what%2526%2523039%3Bs-it-be-normal%3F-1

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

Links:
MySQL binaries centralized repository: http://www.dorsalsource.org

SQLzoo

http://www.sqlzoo.net

Links about database normalization:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1NF

http://www.datamodel.org/NormalizationRules.html

http://dev.mysql.com/tech-resources/articles/intro-to-normalization.html

http://www.utexas.edu/its/windows/database/datamodeling/rm/rm7.html

Acknowledgements

http://www.technocation.org

http://music.podshow.com

http://www.russellwolff.com

http://www.smallfishadventures.com/Home.html “The Thank you song” — Smallfish

Feedback

If you have any feedback about this podcast, dosage or want to suggest topics to cover in future podcasts, physician please email

podcast@technocation.org

You can also:

Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369

Or use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Or use the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum
Listener feedback:

MySQL will go public. Would you buy stock if you had the money? Why or why not?
Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369 (US phone number)

Use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Leave a message at the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum

Send an e-mail to podcast@technocation.org

Episode 8 Show Notes:
This episode’s feature is basic MySQL Security. Not only will we discuss what the basic security is, order but we’ll discuss the *why*s, not just the how’s.

Direct play this episode at:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-8%3A-basic-mysql-security-0

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

News
MySQL offers an unlimited number of Gold licenses per year for $40,000:
http://mysql.com/products/enterprise/unlimited.html
http://mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html

MySQL begins to talk about going public: http://www.businessreviewonline.com/os/archives/2007/01/mysql_set_to_jo.html

Learning Resource:
http://www.hackmysql.com

Feature — MySQL Security:
Bruce Scneier’s latest Crypto-Gram newsletter refers to an article where a person gets on an airplane, having bypassed all airport security via climbing a fence.
http://www.schneier.com/crypto-gram-0701.html
http://www.newsobserver.com/102/story/523482.html

Feedback
To leave a comment, suggestion, question or other feedback:

Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369 (US phone number)

Use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Leave a message at the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum

Send an e-mail to podcast@technocation.org

Acknowledgements/Sponsors
www.technocation.org
http://music.podshow.com
www.russellwolff.com
http://www.smallfishadventures.com/Home.html “The Thank you song” — Smallfish
Thanx to Rich McIver for passing along this link:

http://www.businessintelligencelowdown.com/2007/02/top_10_largest_.html

I’m amused mostly because the article interchanges “database” with “data storage” — many of the sites have “digital documents” included in their count, oncologist and YouTube is in there completely with the amount of space their videos take up. But is all this stuff stored in databases? I do not think so. Anyone know for sure?
http://www.regdeveloper.co.uk/2006/07/18/multivalued_datatypes_access/

This is an interesting read — it would be awesome if MySQL just used the “SET” or “ENUM” data types to be a placeholder for a join table, doctor that it would create automatically for you. Of course, that’s a new level of functionality — MySQL does not implicitly create permanent tables with any commands. But it would be neat.
What happened to the MySQL Winter of Code? Are they waiting for winter in Australia?

I live near Boston, more about MA and I can tell you it’s definitely winter in the northern hemisphere….

So what are we waiting for?

Well, I can say this — we’re waiting for people. The Winter of Code idea is a great one, particularly since if MySQL works with academic institutions they could help students find Master’s Projects or part of Ph.D. work. Imagine someone writing a new storage engine and having that earn them a Master’s degree. This is exactly what MySQL needs — more people who understand database internals and best theoretical practices to start coding and see where it goes. Note the “more people” — they already have staff that does this.

I’m guessing the Winter of Code is nonexistent because of other big announcements that have been happening; still, I would love to see some collaboration with institutions and universities to give incentives to participants and push them to do it. Class credit or fulfilling graduate requirements would be perfect, and there would be many submissions.

Tying together MySQL and universities would be a great leap forward and a very important move for MySQL, as it would generate more contributions to the code. And the contest!
Dorsal Source has a list of where you can get MySQL binaries — official and unofficial — up at:

http://www.dorsalsource.org
In this episode, angina I go over database normalization in general and explain 1st Normal Form (1NF) in depth.

Direct play episode 7 at:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-7%3A-what%2526%2523039%3Bs-it-be-normal%3F-1

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

Links:
MySQL binaries centralized repository: http://www.dorsalsource.org

SQLzoo

http://www.sqlzoo.net

Links about database normalization:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1NF

http://www.datamodel.org/NormalizationRules.html

http://dev.mysql.com/tech-resources/articles/intro-to-normalization.html

http://www.utexas.edu/its/windows/database/datamodeling/rm/rm7.html

Acknowledgements

http://www.technocation.org

http://music.podshow.com

http://www.russellwolff.com

http://www.smallfishadventures.com/Home.html “The Thank you song” — Smallfish

Feedback

If you have any feedback about this podcast, dosage or want to suggest topics to cover in future podcasts, physician please email

podcast@technocation.org

You can also:

Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369

Or use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Or use the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum
Listener feedback:

MySQL will go public. Would you buy stock if you had the money? Why or why not?
Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369 (US phone number)

Use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Leave a message at the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum

Send an e-mail to podcast@technocation.org

Episode 8 Show Notes:
This episode’s feature is basic MySQL Security. Not only will we discuss what the basic security is, order but we’ll discuss the *why*s, not just the how’s.

Direct play this episode at:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-8%3A-basic-mysql-security-0

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

News
MySQL offers an unlimited number of Gold licenses per year for $40,000:
http://mysql.com/products/enterprise/unlimited.html
http://mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html

MySQL begins to talk about going public: http://www.businessreviewonline.com/os/archives/2007/01/mysql_set_to_jo.html

Learning Resource:
http://www.hackmysql.com

Feature — MySQL Security:
Bruce Scneier’s latest Crypto-Gram newsletter refers to an article where a person gets on an airplane, having bypassed all airport security via climbing a fence.
http://www.schneier.com/crypto-gram-0701.html
http://www.newsobserver.com/102/story/523482.html

Feedback
To leave a comment, suggestion, question or other feedback:

Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369 (US phone number)

Use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Leave a message at the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum

Send an e-mail to podcast@technocation.org

Acknowledgements/Sponsors
www.technocation.org
http://music.podshow.com
www.russellwolff.com
http://www.smallfishadventures.com/Home.html “The Thank you song” — Smallfish
Thanx to Rich McIver for passing along this link:

http://www.businessintelligencelowdown.com/2007/02/top_10_largest_.html

I’m amused mostly because the article interchanges “database” with “data storage” — many of the sites have “digital documents” included in their count, oncologist and YouTube is in there completely with the amount of space their videos take up. But is all this stuff stored in databases? I do not think so. Anyone know for sure?
http://www.regdeveloper.co.uk/2006/07/18/multivalued_datatypes_access/

This is an interesting read — it would be awesome if MySQL just used the “SET” or “ENUM” data types to be a placeholder for a join table, doctor that it would create automatically for you. Of course, that’s a new level of functionality — MySQL does not implicitly create permanent tables with any commands. But it would be neat.
What happened to the MySQL Winter of Code? Are they waiting for winter in Australia?

I live near Boston, more about MA and I can tell you it’s definitely winter in the northern hemisphere….

So what are we waiting for?

Well, I can say this — we’re waiting for people. The Winter of Code idea is a great one, particularly since if MySQL works with academic institutions they could help students find Master’s Projects or part of Ph.D. work. Imagine someone writing a new storage engine and having that earn them a Master’s degree. This is exactly what MySQL needs — more people who understand database internals and best theoretical practices to start coding and see where it goes. Note the “more people” — they already have staff that does this.

I’m guessing the Winter of Code is nonexistent because of other big announcements that have been happening; still, I would love to see some collaboration with institutions and universities to give incentives to participants and push them to do it. Class credit or fulfilling graduate requirements would be perfect, and there would be many submissions.

Tying together MySQL and universities would be a great leap forward and a very important move for MySQL, as it would generate more contributions to the code. And the contest!
I work as a QA Engineer in a “stealth mode” startup building a network storage appliance. I am looking for “real world” datasets to load into our appliance to profile performance and scalability of the product given different schema models populated real world distribution of data. I envision looking for two significantly different datasets. One is the “flat file” schema like historical or logging data from Web Server Access and Error logs. The other would be a relational (preferably star schema) database like reservation database or inventory control database.

The data doesn’t need to be current. And it can be scrubbed to remove “real” data. The data won’t be used outside the QA lab. Again, misbirth this is to test “how does the product work when data that lives in the outside world is loaded.”

Ultimately, I am looking for 2 to 10 Terabytes of composite data at the end of the project.
Dorsal Source has a list of where you can get MySQL binaries — official and unofficial — up at:

http://www.dorsalsource.org
In this episode, angina I go over database normalization in general and explain 1st Normal Form (1NF) in depth.

Direct play episode 7 at:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-7%3A-what%2526%2523039%3Bs-it-be-normal%3F-1

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

Links:
MySQL binaries centralized repository: http://www.dorsalsource.org

SQLzoo

http://www.sqlzoo.net

Links about database normalization:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1NF

http://www.datamodel.org/NormalizationRules.html

http://dev.mysql.com/tech-resources/articles/intro-to-normalization.html

http://www.utexas.edu/its/windows/database/datamodeling/rm/rm7.html

Acknowledgements

http://www.technocation.org

http://music.podshow.com

http://www.russellwolff.com

http://www.smallfishadventures.com/Home.html “The Thank you song” — Smallfish

Feedback

If you have any feedback about this podcast, dosage or want to suggest topics to cover in future podcasts, physician please email

podcast@technocation.org

You can also:

Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369

Or use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Or use the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum
Listener feedback:

MySQL will go public. Would you buy stock if you had the money? Why or why not?
Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369 (US phone number)

Use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Leave a message at the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum

Send an e-mail to podcast@technocation.org

Episode 8 Show Notes:
This episode’s feature is basic MySQL Security. Not only will we discuss what the basic security is, order but we’ll discuss the *why*s, not just the how’s.

Direct play this episode at:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-8%3A-basic-mysql-security-0

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

News
MySQL offers an unlimited number of Gold licenses per year for $40,000:
http://mysql.com/products/enterprise/unlimited.html
http://mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html

MySQL begins to talk about going public: http://www.businessreviewonline.com/os/archives/2007/01/mysql_set_to_jo.html

Learning Resource:
http://www.hackmysql.com

Feature — MySQL Security:
Bruce Scneier’s latest Crypto-Gram newsletter refers to an article where a person gets on an airplane, having bypassed all airport security via climbing a fence.
http://www.schneier.com/crypto-gram-0701.html
http://www.newsobserver.com/102/story/523482.html

Feedback
To leave a comment, suggestion, question or other feedback:

Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369 (US phone number)

Use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Leave a message at the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum

Send an e-mail to podcast@technocation.org

Acknowledgements/Sponsors
www.technocation.org
http://music.podshow.com
www.russellwolff.com
http://www.smallfishadventures.com/Home.html “The Thank you song” — Smallfish
Thanx to Rich McIver for passing along this link:

http://www.businessintelligencelowdown.com/2007/02/top_10_largest_.html

I’m amused mostly because the article interchanges “database” with “data storage” — many of the sites have “digital documents” included in their count, oncologist and YouTube is in there completely with the amount of space their videos take up. But is all this stuff stored in databases? I do not think so. Anyone know for sure?
http://www.regdeveloper.co.uk/2006/07/18/multivalued_datatypes_access/

This is an interesting read — it would be awesome if MySQL just used the “SET” or “ENUM” data types to be a placeholder for a join table, doctor that it would create automatically for you. Of course, that’s a new level of functionality — MySQL does not implicitly create permanent tables with any commands. But it would be neat.
What happened to the MySQL Winter of Code? Are they waiting for winter in Australia?

I live near Boston, more about MA and I can tell you it’s definitely winter in the northern hemisphere….

So what are we waiting for?

Well, I can say this — we’re waiting for people. The Winter of Code idea is a great one, particularly since if MySQL works with academic institutions they could help students find Master’s Projects or part of Ph.D. work. Imagine someone writing a new storage engine and having that earn them a Master’s degree. This is exactly what MySQL needs — more people who understand database internals and best theoretical practices to start coding and see where it goes. Note the “more people” — they already have staff that does this.

I’m guessing the Winter of Code is nonexistent because of other big announcements that have been happening; still, I would love to see some collaboration with institutions and universities to give incentives to participants and push them to do it. Class credit or fulfilling graduate requirements would be perfect, and there would be many submissions.

Tying together MySQL and universities would be a great leap forward and a very important move for MySQL, as it would generate more contributions to the code. And the contest!
I work as a QA Engineer in a “stealth mode” startup building a network storage appliance. I am looking for “real world” datasets to load into our appliance to profile performance and scalability of the product given different schema models populated real world distribution of data. I envision looking for two significantly different datasets. One is the “flat file” schema like historical or logging data from Web Server Access and Error logs. The other would be a relational (preferably star schema) database like reservation database or inventory control database.

The data doesn’t need to be current. And it can be scrubbed to remove “real” data. The data won’t be used outside the QA lab. Again, misbirth this is to test “how does the product work when data that lives in the outside world is loaded.”

Ultimately, I am looking for 2 to 10 Terabytes of composite data at the end of the project.
The February Boston MySQL User Group meeting was great! I spoke about MySQL security; you can now download the slides and the video. I continue to be impressed with the sound quality of the video camera I have, medications but you can clearly hear it in the audio (well, I could when I was wearing headphones, but I also have pretty bad hearing).

Special thanks to http://technocation.org for hosting the bandwidth for the videos.

Topics covered in the talk:
ACLs
Test dbs & anonymous accounts
OS files and permissions
Application data flow
SQL Injection
XSS (Cross-site scripting)

PDF of slides (1.4M):
http://www.sheeri.com/presentations/MySQLSecurity2007_02_08.pdf

Slides in Flash (107K):
http://www.sheeri.com/presentations/MySQLSecurity2007_02_08.swf

Video of presentation (large, 289M)
http://technocation.org/videos/original/mysqlsecurity2007_02_08large.wmv

Video of presentation (small, 27M)
http://technocation.org/videos/original/mysqlsecurity2007_02_08small.wmv

Dorsal Source has a list of where you can get MySQL binaries — official and unofficial — up at:

http://www.dorsalsource.org
In this episode, angina I go over database normalization in general and explain 1st Normal Form (1NF) in depth.

Direct play episode 7 at:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-7%3A-what%2526%2523039%3Bs-it-be-normal%3F-1

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

Links:
MySQL binaries centralized repository: http://www.dorsalsource.org

SQLzoo

http://www.sqlzoo.net

Links about database normalization:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1NF

http://www.datamodel.org/NormalizationRules.html

http://dev.mysql.com/tech-resources/articles/intro-to-normalization.html

http://www.utexas.edu/its/windows/database/datamodeling/rm/rm7.html

Acknowledgements

http://www.technocation.org

http://music.podshow.com

http://www.russellwolff.com

http://www.smallfishadventures.com/Home.html “The Thank you song” — Smallfish

Feedback

If you have any feedback about this podcast, dosage or want to suggest topics to cover in future podcasts, physician please email

podcast@technocation.org

You can also:

Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369

Or use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Or use the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum
Listener feedback:

MySQL will go public. Would you buy stock if you had the money? Why or why not?
Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369 (US phone number)

Use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Leave a message at the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum

Send an e-mail to podcast@technocation.org

Episode 8 Show Notes:
This episode’s feature is basic MySQL Security. Not only will we discuss what the basic security is, order but we’ll discuss the *why*s, not just the how’s.

Direct play this episode at:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-8%3A-basic-mysql-security-0

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

News
MySQL offers an unlimited number of Gold licenses per year for $40,000:
http://mysql.com/products/enterprise/unlimited.html
http://mysql.com/products/enterprise/features.html

MySQL begins to talk about going public: http://www.businessreviewonline.com/os/archives/2007/01/mysql_set_to_jo.html

Learning Resource:
http://www.hackmysql.com

Feature — MySQL Security:
Bruce Scneier’s latest Crypto-Gram newsletter refers to an article where a person gets on an airplane, having bypassed all airport security via climbing a fence.
http://www.schneier.com/crypto-gram-0701.html
http://www.newsobserver.com/102/story/523482.html

Feedback
To leave a comment, suggestion, question or other feedback:

Call the comment line at +1 617-674-2369 (US phone number)

Use Odeo to leave a voice mail through your computer:
http://odeo.com/sendmeamessage/Sheeri

Leave a message at the Technocation forums:
http://technocation.org/forum

Send an e-mail to podcast@technocation.org

Acknowledgements/Sponsors
www.technocation.org
http://music.podshow.com
www.russellwolff.com
http://www.smallfishadventures.com/Home.html “The Thank you song” — Smallfish
Thanx to Rich McIver for passing along this link:

http://www.businessintelligencelowdown.com/2007/02/top_10_largest_.html

I’m amused mostly because the article interchanges “database” with “data storage” — many of the sites have “digital documents” included in their count, oncologist and YouTube is in there completely with the amount of space their videos take up. But is all this stuff stored in databases? I do not think so. Anyone know for sure?
http://www.regdeveloper.co.uk/2006/07/18/multivalued_datatypes_access/

This is an interesting read — it would be awesome if MySQL just used the “SET” or “ENUM” data types to be a placeholder for a join table, doctor that it would create automatically for you. Of course, that’s a new level of functionality — MySQL does not implicitly create permanent tables with any commands. But it would be neat.
What happened to the MySQL Winter of Code? Are they waiting for winter in Australia?

I live near Boston, more about MA and I can tell you it’s definitely winter in the northern hemisphere….

So what are we waiting for?

Well, I can say this — we’re waiting for people. The Winter of Code idea is a great one, particularly since if MySQL works with academic institutions they could help students find Master’s Projects or part of Ph.D. work. Imagine someone writing a new storage engine and having that earn them a Master’s degree. This is exactly what MySQL needs — more people who understand database internals and best theoretical practices to start coding and see where it goes. Note the “more people” — they already have staff that does this.

I’m guessing the Winter of Code is nonexistent because of other big announcements that have been happening; still, I would love to see some collaboration with institutions and universities to give incentives to participants and push them to do it. Class credit or fulfilling graduate requirements would be perfect, and there would be many submissions.

Tying together MySQL and universities would be a great leap forward and a very important move for MySQL, as it would generate more contributions to the code. And the contest!
I work as a QA Engineer in a “stealth mode” startup building a network storage appliance. I am looking for “real world” datasets to load into our appliance to profile performance and scalability of the product given different schema models populated real world distribution of data. I envision looking for two significantly different datasets. One is the “flat file” schema like historical or logging data from Web Server Access and Error logs. The other would be a relational (preferably star schema) database like reservation database or inventory control database.

The data doesn’t need to be current. And it can be scrubbed to remove “real” data. The data won’t be used outside the QA lab. Again, misbirth this is to test “how does the product work when data that lives in the outside world is loaded.”

Ultimately, I am looking for 2 to 10 Terabytes of composite data at the end of the project.
The February Boston MySQL User Group meeting was great! I spoke about MySQL security; you can now download the slides and the video. I continue to be impressed with the sound quality of the video camera I have, medications but you can clearly hear it in the audio (well, I could when I was wearing headphones, but I also have pretty bad hearing).

Special thanks to http://technocation.org for hosting the bandwidth for the videos.

Topics covered in the talk:
ACLs
Test dbs & anonymous accounts
OS files and permissions
Application data flow
SQL Injection
XSS (Cross-site scripting)

PDF of slides (1.4M):
http://www.sheeri.com/presentations/MySQLSecurity2007_02_08.pdf

Slides in Flash (107K):
http://www.sheeri.com/presentations/MySQLSecurity2007_02_08.swf

Video of presentation (large, 289M)
http://technocation.org/videos/original/mysqlsecurity2007_02_08large.wmv

Video of presentation (small, 27M)
http://technocation.org/videos/original/mysqlsecurity2007_02_08small.wmv

http://www.webpronews.com/topnews/2007/02/26/techcrunch-others-love-linux-mysql

I’m not quite sure what to say about this article, web except that a sample of 7 “big” sites showed that the LAMP[hp] stack was heavily used. Perhaps, “And this is news?”
This week I spoke with Jay Pipes about the upcoming MySQL Conference, discount sick April 23-26 in Santa Clara, cure California, misbirth USA.

Direct play the podcast here:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-9%3A-jay-speaks-about-mysql-conference

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

I had a setting wrong in my recording program and ended up having a very different sound quality than what I had wanted. I played with it as much as I could, but I apologize for the bad quality audio, especially the breathing that you can hear, the mouse clicks, and when you can hear me swallow and such. (It’s probably not as bad as it sounds, but I shudder at it all, because I want to provide y’all with the best quality possible).

On with the show notes!

Tutorials are 3 hours long (and there are two that have two parts each). The tutorial links and descriptions are here. Tutorials in bold are ones that were mentioned in the podcast:
http://www.mysqlconf.com/pub/w/54/tutorials.html

MySQL Cluster: The Complete Tutorial, Part I
MySQL Cluster: The Complete Tutorial, Part II

MySQL Replication: The Complete Tutorial, Part I
MySQL Replication, The Complete Tutorial, Part II

MySQL 5.0 DBA I Certification Primer
MySQL 5.0 DBA II Certification Primer

Managing Hierarchical Data in MySQL: The Extended Director’s Cut
Vital Rails: An Introduction to the Ruby on Rails Framework
Scaling and High Availability Architectures
MySQL Cluster Certification Primer
MySQL 5.1 In-depth
Writing Your Own Storage Engine
Wikipedia: Site Internals, Configuration and Code Examples, and Management Issues
Real-World MySQL Performance Tuning
MySQL Network Monitoring and Advisory Services: from Soup to Nuts

Registration (and information about discounts, including the $200 discount if you register by March 14th)
http://www.mysqlconf.com/pub/w/54/register.html

There are too many sessions to list, however the conference home page at http://www.mysqlconf.com (scroll to the bottom), and the links take you to a page with all the sessions in that track.

We spoke on the podcast about serving three audiences: DBA’s, Developers, and the General Audience. I’ve taken the liberty of grouping the tracks:

DBA:
Architecture and Technology
Performance Tuning and Benchmarks
Data Warehousing and Business Intelligence
Migration
MySQL Cluster and High Availability
Replication and Scale-Out
Security and Database Administration

Developers:
Java
LAMP
.NET/Windows
PHP and MySQL
Ruby and MySQL

General Audience
Business and Case Studies
Storage Engine Development and Optimization
Web 2.0, Ajax, and Emerging Technologies
The General Track
This week I spoke with Jay Pipes about the upcoming MySQL Conference, discount sick April 23-26 in Santa Clara, cure California, misbirth USA.

Direct play the podcast here:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-9%3A-jay-speaks-about-mysql-conference

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

I had a setting wrong in my recording program and ended up having a very different sound quality than what I had wanted. I played with it as much as I could, but I apologize for the bad quality audio, especially the breathing that you can hear, the mouse clicks, and when you can hear me swallow and such. (It’s probably not as bad as it sounds, but I shudder at it all, because I want to provide y’all with the best quality possible).

On with the show notes!

Tutorials are 3 hours long (and there are two that have two parts each). The tutorial links and descriptions are here. Tutorials in bold are ones that were mentioned in the podcast:
http://www.mysqlconf.com/pub/w/54/tutorials.html

MySQL Cluster: The Complete Tutorial, Part I
MySQL Cluster: The Complete Tutorial, Part II

MySQL Replication: The Complete Tutorial, Part I
MySQL Replication, The Complete Tutorial, Part II

MySQL 5.0 DBA I Certification Primer
MySQL 5.0 DBA II Certification Primer

Managing Hierarchical Data in MySQL: The Extended Director’s Cut
Vital Rails: An Introduction to the Ruby on Rails Framework
Scaling and High Availability Architectures
MySQL Cluster Certification Primer
MySQL 5.1 In-depth
Writing Your Own Storage Engine
Wikipedia: Site Internals, Configuration and Code Examples, and Management Issues
Real-World MySQL Performance Tuning
MySQL Network Monitoring and Advisory Services: from Soup to Nuts

Registration (and information about discounts, including the $200 discount if you register by March 14th)
http://www.mysqlconf.com/pub/w/54/register.html

There are too many sessions to list, however the conference home page at http://www.mysqlconf.com (scroll to the bottom), and the links take you to a page with all the sessions in that track.

We spoke on the podcast about serving three audiences: DBA’s, Developers, and the General Audience. I’ve taken the liberty of grouping the tracks:

DBA:
Architecture and Technology
Performance Tuning and Benchmarks
Data Warehousing and Business Intelligence
Migration
MySQL Cluster and High Availability
Replication and Scale-Out
Security and Database Administration

Developers:
Java
LAMP
.NET/Windows
PHP and MySQL
Ruby and MySQL

General Audience
Business and Case Studies
Storage Engine Development and Optimization
Web 2.0, Ajax, and Emerging Technologies
The General Track
First off, physician everyone I know that’s a good MySQL DBA already has a job — myself included. Occasionally I know of someone looking for a job, audiologist but more often than not, what is ed they end up finding a job rather quickly.

Obviously the best way to find people is word-of-mouth, and the next best way is to find an expert in the field and ask them who they recommend. I am flattered that you consider me an expert and are asking me! If I know of someone, I will definitely let you know. If not, I will probably direct you here.

So, what now? Well, the more people you contact, the better. Finding experts is the right step, and finding people that they know, who are interested in MySQL, is another right step. To that end, first consider your audience — do you want someone who also has skills as a developer? As a sysadmin? As a manager? Find “groups of experts” — or at least “groups of eager learners” near you.

Also, consider what you need. You may think you need “a fulltime DBA” — but what do you really need? Maybe what you need is “someone to make sure backups are running smoothly, help developers write new queries and optimize older ones, and be on call 24/7 for troubleshooting.”

One thing to consider is a consulting firm — particularly if you are having trouble getting headcount. Even if you’re not, though, you can ease into having a DBA, ramping up as needed. For instance, start a consultant on one project, and throw others at him/her as they come up. A full-time DBA might be bored in the first month unless you have a training program for him/her.

So consider a consultant — at the very least they can help fill in the gap while you are on your search for a great DBA. I am a big fan of giving back to the community, so consider MySQL’s own consulting at http://www.mysql.com/consulting/, or the Pythian Group which publishes the Log Buffer each week, or PalominoDB, which does mostly MySQL remote DBA work (and NoSQL). Or, of course, any of the bloggers on http://www.planetmysql.org that have consulting firms are good choices too.

http://www.google.com/search?q=mysql+consulting

The first place to look for a location-specific full-time DBA is the MySQL User Group near the hiring location:

https://wikis.oracle.com/display/mysql/List+of+MySQL+User+Groups

Contact the leader of the group, saying you have a job opening, and ask if there’s an appropriate method to contact the group. Some leaders make the announcements themselves, others allow posting on a message board. If you are an agency, be upfront about it; if you’re not, also mention “this is for my company, I am not a headhunter” or similar language.

Most group leaders are looking to do less work, and the least work possible is to have you come to a meeting and announce your job opening, so any questions can be answered by you right away. If, of course, that’s allowed.

Here are my suggestions if you’re looking to hire in the Boston area. These are easily translated to looking for folks in your area:

Attend the Boston MySQL User Group and make an announcement. Boston MySQL user group meetings are usually held on the 2nd Monday of every month, but check the calendar to be sure — http://mysql.meetup.com/137/calendar/

As I am the leader of the Boston MySQL User Group, I will say that you may also post it to the User Group’s message board at http://mysql.meetup.com/137/boards — a note of caution, about once a week a job is posted there, so it’s really better to come to the meeting in person — you distinguish yourself. If you can’t attend, feel free to send me a description, although I can say it’s better to go in person, because all I know is what you give me, and if a person has a question you’re in a better position to answer it than I am.

Another option is similar groups. I can personally recommend both these groups for high quality people (in general) and you can say that I recommended the groups:

BLU, the Boston Linux and Unix Users group: http://www.blu.org/
and
BBLISA, http://www.bblisa.org/

In all cases, going there in person gives you a lot more cachet to talk about stuff; e-mailing the group leaders asking if you can come and announce your job opening is not a bad thing. (but do stay for the whole presentation; bring your laptop, everyone does, and work on something else if you want, but it’s polite to stay).

Other pages with lists of user groups that might be helpful:

http://web.meetup.com/cities/us/ma/boston/?from=loc_pick

http://web.mit.edu/ist/usergroups/
(this is a list of all User Groups that MIT hosts, so some are not relevant at all)

I hope this helps!

This week I spoke with Jay Pipes about the upcoming MySQL Conference, discount sick April 23-26 in Santa Clara, cure California, misbirth USA.

Direct play the podcast here:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-9%3A-jay-speaks-about-mysql-conference

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

I had a setting wrong in my recording program and ended up having a very different sound quality than what I had wanted. I played with it as much as I could, but I apologize for the bad quality audio, especially the breathing that you can hear, the mouse clicks, and when you can hear me swallow and such. (It’s probably not as bad as it sounds, but I shudder at it all, because I want to provide y’all with the best quality possible).

On with the show notes!

Tutorials are 3 hours long (and there are two that have two parts each). The tutorial links and descriptions are here. Tutorials in bold are ones that were mentioned in the podcast:
http://www.mysqlconf.com/pub/w/54/tutorials.html

MySQL Cluster: The Complete Tutorial, Part I
MySQL Cluster: The Complete Tutorial, Part II

MySQL Replication: The Complete Tutorial, Part I
MySQL Replication, The Complete Tutorial, Part II

MySQL 5.0 DBA I Certification Primer
MySQL 5.0 DBA II Certification Primer

Managing Hierarchical Data in MySQL: The Extended Director’s Cut
Vital Rails: An Introduction to the Ruby on Rails Framework
Scaling and High Availability Architectures
MySQL Cluster Certification Primer
MySQL 5.1 In-depth
Writing Your Own Storage Engine
Wikipedia: Site Internals, Configuration and Code Examples, and Management Issues
Real-World MySQL Performance Tuning
MySQL Network Monitoring and Advisory Services: from Soup to Nuts

Registration (and information about discounts, including the $200 discount if you register by March 14th)
http://www.mysqlconf.com/pub/w/54/register.html

There are too many sessions to list, however the conference home page at http://www.mysqlconf.com (scroll to the bottom), and the links take you to a page with all the sessions in that track.

We spoke on the podcast about serving three audiences: DBA’s, Developers, and the General Audience. I’ve taken the liberty of grouping the tracks:

DBA:
Architecture and Technology
Performance Tuning and Benchmarks
Data Warehousing and Business Intelligence
Migration
MySQL Cluster and High Availability
Replication and Scale-Out
Security and Database Administration

Developers:
Java
LAMP
.NET/Windows
PHP and MySQL
Ruby and MySQL

General Audience
Business and Case Studies
Storage Engine Development and Optimization
Web 2.0, Ajax, and Emerging Technologies
The General Track
First off, physician everyone I know that’s a good MySQL DBA already has a job — myself included. Occasionally I know of someone looking for a job, audiologist but more often than not, what is ed they end up finding a job rather quickly.

Obviously the best way to find people is word-of-mouth, and the next best way is to find an expert in the field and ask them who they recommend. I am flattered that you consider me an expert and are asking me! If I know of someone, I will definitely let you know. If not, I will probably direct you here.

So, what now? Well, the more people you contact, the better. Finding experts is the right step, and finding people that they know, who are interested in MySQL, is another right step. To that end, first consider your audience — do you want someone who also has skills as a developer? As a sysadmin? As a manager? Find “groups of experts” — or at least “groups of eager learners” near you.

Also, consider what you need. You may think you need “a fulltime DBA” — but what do you really need? Maybe what you need is “someone to make sure backups are running smoothly, help developers write new queries and optimize older ones, and be on call 24/7 for troubleshooting.”

One thing to consider is a consulting firm — particularly if you are having trouble getting headcount. Even if you’re not, though, you can ease into having a DBA, ramping up as needed. For instance, start a consultant on one project, and throw others at him/her as they come up. A full-time DBA might be bored in the first month unless you have a training program for him/her.

So consider a consultant — at the very least they can help fill in the gap while you are on your search for a great DBA. I am a big fan of giving back to the community, so consider MySQL’s own consulting at http://www.mysql.com/consulting/, or the Pythian Group which publishes the Log Buffer each week, or PalominoDB, which does mostly MySQL remote DBA work (and NoSQL). Or, of course, any of the bloggers on http://www.planetmysql.org that have consulting firms are good choices too.

http://www.google.com/search?q=mysql+consulting

The first place to look for a location-specific full-time DBA is the MySQL User Group near the hiring location:

https://wikis.oracle.com/display/mysql/List+of+MySQL+User+Groups

Contact the leader of the group, saying you have a job opening, and ask if there’s an appropriate method to contact the group. Some leaders make the announcements themselves, others allow posting on a message board. If you are an agency, be upfront about it; if you’re not, also mention “this is for my company, I am not a headhunter” or similar language.

Most group leaders are looking to do less work, and the least work possible is to have you come to a meeting and announce your job opening, so any questions can be answered by you right away. If, of course, that’s allowed.

Here are my suggestions if you’re looking to hire in the Boston area. These are easily translated to looking for folks in your area:

Attend the Boston MySQL User Group and make an announcement. Boston MySQL user group meetings are usually held on the 2nd Monday of every month, but check the calendar to be sure — http://mysql.meetup.com/137/calendar/

As I am the leader of the Boston MySQL User Group, I will say that you may also post it to the User Group’s message board at http://mysql.meetup.com/137/boards — a note of caution, about once a week a job is posted there, so it’s really better to come to the meeting in person — you distinguish yourself. If you can’t attend, feel free to send me a description, although I can say it’s better to go in person, because all I know is what you give me, and if a person has a question you’re in a better position to answer it than I am.

Another option is similar groups. I can personally recommend both these groups for high quality people (in general) and you can say that I recommended the groups:

BLU, the Boston Linux and Unix Users group: http://www.blu.org/
and
BBLISA, http://www.bblisa.org/

In all cases, going there in person gives you a lot more cachet to talk about stuff; e-mailing the group leaders asking if you can come and announce your job opening is not a bad thing. (but do stay for the whole presentation; bring your laptop, everyone does, and work on something else if you want, but it’s polite to stay).

Other pages with lists of user groups that might be helpful:

http://web.meetup.com/cities/us/ma/boston/?from=loc_pick

http://web.mit.edu/ist/usergroups/
(this is a list of all User Groups that MIT hosts, so some are not relevant at all)

I hope this helps!

For those that follow Daylight Savings Time in the US and Canada, emergency watch out this weekend, cardiologist because we “spring forward”!

The biggest caveat I have is: Do not arrive 1 hour late to work on Sunday or Monday.

As for MySQL, to test if you are fine, run:

SELECT @@global.time_zone;

If you get back “SYSTEM”, then MySQL is looking to the OS for timezone data, which is the default.

The real sanity check:

SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2007-03-11 02:00:00'), UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2007-03-11 03:00:00');

This should return the same value, even though you are feeding it different times, because this is when the 1 hr change occurs. If not, and you’ve played with timezone data, remember that timezone data is only loaded when MySQL starts, so if you haven’t restarted MySQL since you patched your OS, you need to do that.

This is mostly stolen from a MySQL list post I found here:

http://lists.mysql.com/mysql/205321
This week I spoke with Jay Pipes about the upcoming MySQL Conference, discount sick April 23-26 in Santa Clara, cure California, misbirth USA.

Direct play the podcast here:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-9%3A-jay-speaks-about-mysql-conference

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

I had a setting wrong in my recording program and ended up having a very different sound quality than what I had wanted. I played with it as much as I could, but I apologize for the bad quality audio, especially the breathing that you can hear, the mouse clicks, and when you can hear me swallow and such. (It’s probably not as bad as it sounds, but I shudder at it all, because I want to provide y’all with the best quality possible).

On with the show notes!

Tutorials are 3 hours long (and there are two that have two parts each). The tutorial links and descriptions are here. Tutorials in bold are ones that were mentioned in the podcast:
http://www.mysqlconf.com/pub/w/54/tutorials.html

MySQL Cluster: The Complete Tutorial, Part I
MySQL Cluster: The Complete Tutorial, Part II

MySQL Replication: The Complete Tutorial, Part I
MySQL Replication, The Complete Tutorial, Part II

MySQL 5.0 DBA I Certification Primer
MySQL 5.0 DBA II Certification Primer

Managing Hierarchical Data in MySQL: The Extended Director’s Cut
Vital Rails: An Introduction to the Ruby on Rails Framework
Scaling and High Availability Architectures
MySQL Cluster Certification Primer
MySQL 5.1 In-depth
Writing Your Own Storage Engine
Wikipedia: Site Internals, Configuration and Code Examples, and Management Issues
Real-World MySQL Performance Tuning
MySQL Network Monitoring and Advisory Services: from Soup to Nuts

Registration (and information about discounts, including the $200 discount if you register by March 14th)
http://www.mysqlconf.com/pub/w/54/register.html

There are too many sessions to list, however the conference home page at http://www.mysqlconf.com (scroll to the bottom), and the links take you to a page with all the sessions in that track.

We spoke on the podcast about serving three audiences: DBA’s, Developers, and the General Audience. I’ve taken the liberty of grouping the tracks:

DBA:
Architecture and Technology
Performance Tuning and Benchmarks
Data Warehousing and Business Intelligence
Migration
MySQL Cluster and High Availability
Replication and Scale-Out
Security and Database Administration

Developers:
Java
LAMP
.NET/Windows
PHP and MySQL
Ruby and MySQL

General Audience
Business and Case Studies
Storage Engine Development and Optimization
Web 2.0, Ajax, and Emerging Technologies
The General Track
First off, physician everyone I know that’s a good MySQL DBA already has a job — myself included. Occasionally I know of someone looking for a job, audiologist but more often than not, what is ed they end up finding a job rather quickly.

Obviously the best way to find people is word-of-mouth, and the next best way is to find an expert in the field and ask them who they recommend. I am flattered that you consider me an expert and are asking me! If I know of someone, I will definitely let you know. If not, I will probably direct you here.

So, what now? Well, the more people you contact, the better. Finding experts is the right step, and finding people that they know, who are interested in MySQL, is another right step. To that end, first consider your audience — do you want someone who also has skills as a developer? As a sysadmin? As a manager? Find “groups of experts” — or at least “groups of eager learners” near you.

Also, consider what you need. You may think you need “a fulltime DBA” — but what do you really need? Maybe what you need is “someone to make sure backups are running smoothly, help developers write new queries and optimize older ones, and be on call 24/7 for troubleshooting.”

One thing to consider is a consulting firm — particularly if you are having trouble getting headcount. Even if you’re not, though, you can ease into having a DBA, ramping up as needed. For instance, start a consultant on one project, and throw others at him/her as they come up. A full-time DBA might be bored in the first month unless you have a training program for him/her.

So consider a consultant — at the very least they can help fill in the gap while you are on your search for a great DBA. I am a big fan of giving back to the community, so consider MySQL’s own consulting at http://www.mysql.com/consulting/, or the Pythian Group which publishes the Log Buffer each week, or PalominoDB, which does mostly MySQL remote DBA work (and NoSQL). Or, of course, any of the bloggers on http://www.planetmysql.org that have consulting firms are good choices too.

http://www.google.com/search?q=mysql+consulting

The first place to look for a location-specific full-time DBA is the MySQL User Group near the hiring location:

https://wikis.oracle.com/display/mysql/List+of+MySQL+User+Groups

Contact the leader of the group, saying you have a job opening, and ask if there’s an appropriate method to contact the group. Some leaders make the announcements themselves, others allow posting on a message board. If you are an agency, be upfront about it; if you’re not, also mention “this is for my company, I am not a headhunter” or similar language.

Most group leaders are looking to do less work, and the least work possible is to have you come to a meeting and announce your job opening, so any questions can be answered by you right away. If, of course, that’s allowed.

Here are my suggestions if you’re looking to hire in the Boston area. These are easily translated to looking for folks in your area:

Attend the Boston MySQL User Group and make an announcement. Boston MySQL user group meetings are usually held on the 2nd Monday of every month, but check the calendar to be sure — http://mysql.meetup.com/137/calendar/

As I am the leader of the Boston MySQL User Group, I will say that you may also post it to the User Group’s message board at http://mysql.meetup.com/137/boards — a note of caution, about once a week a job is posted there, so it’s really better to come to the meeting in person — you distinguish yourself. If you can’t attend, feel free to send me a description, although I can say it’s better to go in person, because all I know is what you give me, and if a person has a question you’re in a better position to answer it than I am.

Another option is similar groups. I can personally recommend both these groups for high quality people (in general) and you can say that I recommended the groups:

BLU, the Boston Linux and Unix Users group: http://www.blu.org/
and
BBLISA, http://www.bblisa.org/

In all cases, going there in person gives you a lot more cachet to talk about stuff; e-mailing the group leaders asking if you can come and announce your job opening is not a bad thing. (but do stay for the whole presentation; bring your laptop, everyone does, and work on something else if you want, but it’s polite to stay).

Other pages with lists of user groups that might be helpful:

http://web.meetup.com/cities/us/ma/boston/?from=loc_pick

http://web.mit.edu/ist/usergroups/
(this is a list of all User Groups that MIT hosts, so some are not relevant at all)

I hope this helps!

For those that follow Daylight Savings Time in the US and Canada, emergency watch out this weekend, cardiologist because we “spring forward”!

The biggest caveat I have is: Do not arrive 1 hour late to work on Sunday or Monday.

As for MySQL, to test if you are fine, run:

SELECT @@global.time_zone;

If you get back “SYSTEM”, then MySQL is looking to the OS for timezone data, which is the default.

The real sanity check:

SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2007-03-11 02:00:00'), UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2007-03-11 03:00:00');

This should return the same value, even though you are feeding it different times, because this is when the 1 hr change occurs. If not, and you’ve played with timezone data, remember that timezone data is only loaded when MySQL starts, so if you haven’t restarted MySQL since you patched your OS, you need to do that.

This is mostly stolen from a MySQL list post I found here:

http://lists.mysql.com/mysql/205321
This week I talk about the MySQL Query Cache.

Direct play the podcast here:
http://technocation.org/content/oursql-episode-10%3A-how-about-some-cache%3F-0

Subscribe to the podcast by clicking:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=206806301

You can Direct download all the oursql podcasts at:
http://technocation.org/podcasts/oursql/

Show notes:

Listener Feedback:
http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/4.1/en/mysql-commands.html

News:
Daylight Savings Time and how to check your system:
http://sheeri.net/archives/188

There’s not much more time left to register for the MySQL Users Conference & Expo before the $200 early bird discount disappears!
http://www.mysqlconf.com

Learning Resource:

Check out the 2006 MySQL conference presentation slides by the speakers! http://mysqlconf.com/pub/w/45/presentations.html

Feature: How about some cache?
The MySQL Manual has a short, salve very readable chapter on the Query Cache, ed which starts here:

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/query-cache.html

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