Lesson 07: Advanced MySQL Querying

Notes/errata/updates for Chapter 7:
See the official book errata at http://tahaghoghi.com/LearningMySQL/errata.php – Chapter 7 includes pages 223 – 275.

Supplemental blog post – ORDER BY NULL – read the blog post and the comments!

GROUP BY and HAVING examples – Supplemental blog post. The example of HAVING in the text shows a use case where HAVING is the same function as WHERE. This blog posts shows examples of HAVING that you cannot do any other way.

In the section called “The GROUP BY clause”, on pages 231-232, the book says:
“you can count any column in a group, and you’ll get the same answer, so COUNT(artist_name) is the same as COUNT(*) or COUNT(artist_id).” This is not 100% true; COUNT does not count NULL values, so if you had 10 rows and 1 artist_name was NULL, COUNT(artist_name) would return 9 instead of 10. COUNT(*) counts the number of rows and would always return 10, so COUNT(*) is preferable when you intend to count the number of rows.

Also in that section, on page 233 when they show you the example:
SELECT * FROM track GROUP BY artist_id;
– Note that they explain the result is not meaningful. In most other database systems, this query would not be allowed.

In the “Advanced Joins” section, specifically on page 238 at the bottom where they say “There’s no real advantage or disadvantage in using an ON or a WHERE clause; it’s just a matter of taste.” While that’s true for the MySQL parser, it’s much easier for humans to read, and see if you missed a join condition, if you put the join conditions in an ON clause.

In the section on Nested Queries, on page 251, it says “nested queries are hard to optimize, and so they’re almost always slower to run than the unnested alternative.” MySQL has gotten better and better at optimizing nested queries, so this statement isn’t necessarily true any more.

A “derived table”, is a nested query in the FROM Clause, as described in the section heading with that name (p. 262).

In the “Table Types” subsection (p. 267), it says that MyISAM is a good choice for storage engines, and that “you very rarely need to make any other choice in small-to medium-size applications”. However, it’s recommended to use InnoDB for better concurrency, transaction support and being safer from data corruption in a crash situation. Indeed, the default storage engine in more recent versions of MySQL is InnoDB.

In addition, the lingo has been changed since the book was written; we now use “storage engine” instead of “table type”. The examples that use CREATE TABLE or ALTER TABLE with TYPE may need to be changed to STORAGE ENGINE instead of TYPE.

Finally, you can skip the section on BDB since it has been deprecated (p. 274-5).

Topics covered:
Aliases
Join style
Joins (JOIN, INNER, COMMA, STRAIGHT, RIGHT, LEFT, NATURAL)
UNION and UNION ALL
Data aggregation (DISTINCT, GROUP BY, HAVING
Subqueries and Nested Queries (including ANY, SOME, ALL, IN, NOT IN, EXISTS, NOT EXISTS, correlated subqueries, derived tables, row subqueries)
User Variables
Transactions/locking
Table Types/Storage engines

Reference/Quick Links for MySQL Marinate

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