First Boston MySQL User Group Meeting

To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
The first Boston MySQL User Group meeting went swimmingly. About 1/2 the people who RSVP’s yes or maybe showed up, ) got pizza as a thank-you gift.

My boss offered me a ride home, definitely — I’ll just go into work later, and not be tempted by a ride home.

The demographics of the group was really amazing:

about 15% female
those with no experience with any database
those with experience with databases but not MySQL
those who’ve been using MySQL for weeks
those who’ve been using MySQL for months
those who’ve been using MySQL for years
those who are trying to convince their company to switch
about 10% Indian
about 20% other-Asian
(I didn’t notice anyone that was recognizably Hispanic or black)
job titles ranging from developer, dba, all the way up to the vice president and president level
The publishing sector was represented by O’Reilly, Addison-Wesley (which is owned by Pearson, which handles the MySQL Press imprint), and Apress. O’Reilly and Apress solicited authors.

Corrections always welcome, and special thanks to Mike Kruckenberg, and Mark Rubin of MySQL AB.

I cannot wait for next month. . .

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