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Brief Outage for Phoenix Data Center Chassis

I am about to give a talk at MySQL Connect about what you need to know before upgrading to MySQL 5.6.

The PDF slides are online at http://bit.ly/upgrade56. I will be posting a video in the next few weeks!

I am about to give a talk at MySQL Connect about what you need to know before upgrading to MySQL 5.6.

The PDF slides are online at http://bit.ly/upgrade56. I will be posting a video in the next few weeks!

The 3rd season of MySQL Marinate begins October 1st, information pills or if you prefer, price MariaDB or Percona.

If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” on the O’Reilly book page for Learning MySQL. There is homework for week 1, see the master list for all the information.

If you would like to learn MySQL from the ground up, consider joining us. This is for beginners – If you have no experience with MySQL, or if you are a developer that wants to learn how to administer MySQL, or an administrator that wants to learn how to query MySQL, this course is what you want.

If you are not a beginner, you are welcome to join too – maybe you need a refresher, or maybe you just want to test your knowledge or earn badges. That’s OK too!

The format of a virtual self-study group is as follows:

Each participant acquires the same textbook (Learning MySQL, the “butterfly O’Reilly book”, published 2007). You can acquire the textbook however you want (e.g. from the libary or from a friend) but if you buy the book, we ask that you buy it from our Amazon Store, to help pay for meetup fees.

Each participant commits to read one chapter per week, complete the exercises and post a link to the completed work. Tweet using the hashtag #mysqlmarinate.

Each participant obtains assistance by posting questions to a discussion area set up on the Virtual Tech Self Study Message Board for each chapter.

Each participant receives a badge upon finishing each chapter and all assignments.

Note: There is no classroom or video instruction.

How do I get started?

Become a member of the Virtual Tech Self Study Meetup Group.

Register for MySQL Marinate. RSVP to this event: Yes

Acquire the book (the only item that may cost money). Get your hands Learning MySQL – see if your local library has it, if someone is selling their copy, or buy it from our Amazon Store (this helps pay for meetup fees).

When your book arrives, start your virtual learning by reading one chapter per week. Complete the exercises; if you have any questions, comments or want to learn more in-depth, that’s what the forums are for!

Learning MySQL

FAQs:

Q: How long will the course last?

A: We will cover 12 lessons (chapters) in the book, so 12 (twelve) weeks starting October 1st, though we will have one week that is a break so that you can catch up if you need to or you have a week off if you need it. Refer to the MySQL Marinate Season 3 Master Discussion List for specific dates.

By January 1st, 2014, you will know MySQL!!

Q: Can I get ahead?

A: Sure! This is go-at-your-own-pace. To prevent spoilers, please put comments in the appropriate chapter threads.

Q: Does this cover the Percona patch set or MariaDB forks?

A: This covers the basics of MySQL, which are immediately transferable to Percona’s patched MySQL or MariaDB builds.

Q: What do I need in order to start the course?

A: All you need is the book and access to a computer, preferably one that you have control over. Installing MySQL is chapter 2, so really, all you need is the book and a computer to start, you don’t have to worry about any prerequisites. If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” at the O’Reilly Learning MySQL page.

Q: Where can I put completed assignments?

A: You will be able to put completed assignments on github. Instructions are in week 1.

Q: The book was published in 2007. Isn’t that a bit old?

A: Yes! O’Reilly is working on new material, but it is not ready yet. The basics are still accurate, and we will let you know what in the book is outdated. We will also have optional supplemental/”extra credit” material for those who want to learn more right away. We are confident that this self-study course will make you ready to dive into other, more advanced material.

Soak it in!

*either tomorrow or today, depending on when and where you read this. Or it was in the past, if you have to catch up on your blog posts. It’s OK, you can join us late, too. You can go at your own pace.

I am about to give a talk at MySQL Connect about what you need to know before upgrading to MySQL 5.6.

The PDF slides are online at http://bit.ly/upgrade56. I will be posting a video in the next few weeks!

The 3rd season of MySQL Marinate begins October 1st, information pills or if you prefer, price MariaDB or Percona.

If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” on the O’Reilly book page for Learning MySQL. There is homework for week 1, see the master list for all the information.

If you would like to learn MySQL from the ground up, consider joining us. This is for beginners – If you have no experience with MySQL, or if you are a developer that wants to learn how to administer MySQL, or an administrator that wants to learn how to query MySQL, this course is what you want.

If you are not a beginner, you are welcome to join too – maybe you need a refresher, or maybe you just want to test your knowledge or earn badges. That’s OK too!

The format of a virtual self-study group is as follows:

Each participant acquires the same textbook (Learning MySQL, the “butterfly O’Reilly book”, published 2007). You can acquire the textbook however you want (e.g. from the libary or from a friend) but if you buy the book, we ask that you buy it from our Amazon Store, to help pay for meetup fees.

Each participant commits to read one chapter per week, complete the exercises and post a link to the completed work. Tweet using the hashtag #mysqlmarinate.

Each participant obtains assistance by posting questions to a discussion area set up on the Virtual Tech Self Study Message Board for each chapter.

Each participant receives a badge upon finishing each chapter and all assignments.

Note: There is no classroom or video instruction.

How do I get started?

Become a member of the Virtual Tech Self Study Meetup Group.

Register for MySQL Marinate. RSVP to this event: Yes

Acquire the book (the only item that may cost money). Get your hands Learning MySQL – see if your local library has it, if someone is selling their copy, or buy it from our Amazon Store (this helps pay for meetup fees).

When your book arrives, start your virtual learning by reading one chapter per week. Complete the exercises; if you have any questions, comments or want to learn more in-depth, that’s what the forums are for!

Learning MySQL

FAQs:

Q: How long will the course last?

A: We will cover 12 lessons (chapters) in the book, so 12 (twelve) weeks starting October 1st, though we will have one week that is a break so that you can catch up if you need to or you have a week off if you need it. Refer to the MySQL Marinate Season 3 Master Discussion List for specific dates.

By January 1st, 2014, you will know MySQL!!

Q: Can I get ahead?

A: Sure! This is go-at-your-own-pace. To prevent spoilers, please put comments in the appropriate chapter threads.

Q: Does this cover the Percona patch set or MariaDB forks?

A: This covers the basics of MySQL, which are immediately transferable to Percona’s patched MySQL or MariaDB builds.

Q: What do I need in order to start the course?

A: All you need is the book and access to a computer, preferably one that you have control over. Installing MySQL is chapter 2, so really, all you need is the book and a computer to start, you don’t have to worry about any prerequisites. If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” at the O’Reilly Learning MySQL page.

Q: Where can I put completed assignments?

A: You will be able to put completed assignments on github. Instructions are in week 1.

Q: The book was published in 2007. Isn’t that a bit old?

A: Yes! O’Reilly is working on new material, but it is not ready yet. The basics are still accurate, and we will let you know what in the book is outdated. We will also have optional supplemental/”extra credit” material for those who want to learn more right away. We are confident that this self-study course will make you ready to dive into other, more advanced material.

Soak it in!

*either tomorrow or today, depending on when and where you read this. Or it was in the past, if you have to catch up on your blog posts. It’s OK, you can join us late, too. You can go at your own pace.

During yesterday’s MySQL Connect conference, viagra so that all can benefit. The slides for the talk are at http://bit.ly/puppet-mysql-slides.

I am about to give a talk at MySQL Connect about what you need to know before upgrading to MySQL 5.6.

The PDF slides are online at http://bit.ly/upgrade56. I will be posting a video in the next few weeks!

The 3rd season of MySQL Marinate begins October 1st, information pills or if you prefer, price MariaDB or Percona.

If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” on the O’Reilly book page for Learning MySQL. There is homework for week 1, see the master list for all the information.

If you would like to learn MySQL from the ground up, consider joining us. This is for beginners – If you have no experience with MySQL, or if you are a developer that wants to learn how to administer MySQL, or an administrator that wants to learn how to query MySQL, this course is what you want.

If you are not a beginner, you are welcome to join too – maybe you need a refresher, or maybe you just want to test your knowledge or earn badges. That’s OK too!

The format of a virtual self-study group is as follows:

Each participant acquires the same textbook (Learning MySQL, the “butterfly O’Reilly book”, published 2007). You can acquire the textbook however you want (e.g. from the libary or from a friend) but if you buy the book, we ask that you buy it from our Amazon Store, to help pay for meetup fees.

Each participant commits to read one chapter per week, complete the exercises and post a link to the completed work. Tweet using the hashtag #mysqlmarinate.

Each participant obtains assistance by posting questions to a discussion area set up on the Virtual Tech Self Study Message Board for each chapter.

Each participant receives a badge upon finishing each chapter and all assignments.

Note: There is no classroom or video instruction.

How do I get started?

Become a member of the Virtual Tech Self Study Meetup Group.

Register for MySQL Marinate. RSVP to this event: Yes

Acquire the book (the only item that may cost money). Get your hands Learning MySQL – see if your local library has it, if someone is selling their copy, or buy it from our Amazon Store (this helps pay for meetup fees).

When your book arrives, start your virtual learning by reading one chapter per week. Complete the exercises; if you have any questions, comments or want to learn more in-depth, that’s what the forums are for!

Learning MySQL

FAQs:

Q: How long will the course last?

A: We will cover 12 lessons (chapters) in the book, so 12 (twelve) weeks starting October 1st, though we will have one week that is a break so that you can catch up if you need to or you have a week off if you need it. Refer to the MySQL Marinate Season 3 Master Discussion List for specific dates.

By January 1st, 2014, you will know MySQL!!

Q: Can I get ahead?

A: Sure! This is go-at-your-own-pace. To prevent spoilers, please put comments in the appropriate chapter threads.

Q: Does this cover the Percona patch set or MariaDB forks?

A: This covers the basics of MySQL, which are immediately transferable to Percona’s patched MySQL or MariaDB builds.

Q: What do I need in order to start the course?

A: All you need is the book and access to a computer, preferably one that you have control over. Installing MySQL is chapter 2, so really, all you need is the book and a computer to start, you don’t have to worry about any prerequisites. If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” at the O’Reilly Learning MySQL page.

Q: Where can I put completed assignments?

A: You will be able to put completed assignments on github. Instructions are in week 1.

Q: The book was published in 2007. Isn’t that a bit old?

A: Yes! O’Reilly is working on new material, but it is not ready yet. The basics are still accurate, and we will let you know what in the book is outdated. We will also have optional supplemental/”extra credit” material for those who want to learn more right away. We are confident that this self-study course will make you ready to dive into other, more advanced material.

Soak it in!

*either tomorrow or today, depending on when and where you read this. Or it was in the past, if you have to catch up on your blog posts. It’s OK, you can join us late, too. You can go at your own pace.

During yesterday’s MySQL Connect conference, viagra so that all can benefit. The slides for the talk are at http://bit.ly/puppet-mysql-slides.

Recently I gave a new talk to both the Tokyo and Boston MySQL User Groups about how to get started using performance schema. I have put some resources online for those interested:

Performance Schema talk video

PDF slides

The feedback has been excellent, human enhancement so I hope that you find this video useful when trying to learn how to use performance schema and dive into the depth of the information it provides you.

I am about to give a talk at MySQL Connect about what you need to know before upgrading to MySQL 5.6.

The PDF slides are online at http://bit.ly/upgrade56. I will be posting a video in the next few weeks!

The 3rd season of MySQL Marinate begins October 1st, information pills or if you prefer, price MariaDB or Percona.

If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” on the O’Reilly book page for Learning MySQL. There is homework for week 1, see the master list for all the information.

If you would like to learn MySQL from the ground up, consider joining us. This is for beginners – If you have no experience with MySQL, or if you are a developer that wants to learn how to administer MySQL, or an administrator that wants to learn how to query MySQL, this course is what you want.

If you are not a beginner, you are welcome to join too – maybe you need a refresher, or maybe you just want to test your knowledge or earn badges. That’s OK too!

The format of a virtual self-study group is as follows:

Each participant acquires the same textbook (Learning MySQL, the “butterfly O’Reilly book”, published 2007). You can acquire the textbook however you want (e.g. from the libary or from a friend) but if you buy the book, we ask that you buy it from our Amazon Store, to help pay for meetup fees.

Each participant commits to read one chapter per week, complete the exercises and post a link to the completed work. Tweet using the hashtag #mysqlmarinate.

Each participant obtains assistance by posting questions to a discussion area set up on the Virtual Tech Self Study Message Board for each chapter.

Each participant receives a badge upon finishing each chapter and all assignments.

Note: There is no classroom or video instruction.

How do I get started?

Become a member of the Virtual Tech Self Study Meetup Group.

Register for MySQL Marinate. RSVP to this event: Yes

Acquire the book (the only item that may cost money). Get your hands Learning MySQL – see if your local library has it, if someone is selling their copy, or buy it from our Amazon Store (this helps pay for meetup fees).

When your book arrives, start your virtual learning by reading one chapter per week. Complete the exercises; if you have any questions, comments or want to learn more in-depth, that’s what the forums are for!

Learning MySQL

FAQs:

Q: How long will the course last?

A: We will cover 12 lessons (chapters) in the book, so 12 (twelve) weeks starting October 1st, though we will have one week that is a break so that you can catch up if you need to or you have a week off if you need it. Refer to the MySQL Marinate Season 3 Master Discussion List for specific dates.

By January 1st, 2014, you will know MySQL!!

Q: Can I get ahead?

A: Sure! This is go-at-your-own-pace. To prevent spoilers, please put comments in the appropriate chapter threads.

Q: Does this cover the Percona patch set or MariaDB forks?

A: This covers the basics of MySQL, which are immediately transferable to Percona’s patched MySQL or MariaDB builds.

Q: What do I need in order to start the course?

A: All you need is the book and access to a computer, preferably one that you have control over. Installing MySQL is chapter 2, so really, all you need is the book and a computer to start, you don’t have to worry about any prerequisites. If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” at the O’Reilly Learning MySQL page.

Q: Where can I put completed assignments?

A: You will be able to put completed assignments on github. Instructions are in week 1.

Q: The book was published in 2007. Isn’t that a bit old?

A: Yes! O’Reilly is working on new material, but it is not ready yet. The basics are still accurate, and we will let you know what in the book is outdated. We will also have optional supplemental/”extra credit” material for those who want to learn more right away. We are confident that this self-study course will make you ready to dive into other, more advanced material.

Soak it in!

*either tomorrow or today, depending on when and where you read this. Or it was in the past, if you have to catch up on your blog posts. It’s OK, you can join us late, too. You can go at your own pace.

During yesterday’s MySQL Connect conference, viagra so that all can benefit. The slides for the talk are at http://bit.ly/puppet-mysql-slides.

Recently I gave a new talk to both the Tokyo and Boston MySQL User Groups about how to get started using performance schema. I have put some resources online for those interested:

Performance Schema talk video

PDF slides

The feedback has been excellent, human enhancement so I hope that you find this video useful when trying to learn how to use performance schema and dive into the depth of the information it provides you.

I am doing a quick blog post to announce that I have put an indexing talk online*. Most recently, drug I delivered this indexing talk at Confoo and Scale 11x.

The talk is on YouTube at Are You Getting the Best Out of Your MySQL Indexes? There are also PDF slides.
From the official conference description, visit this site if you want to know more:
MySQL indexes are often used to make performance better. However, more about they can make performance suffer if you are not using them properly. Oracle ACE Director Sheeri Cabral explains the pitfalls to avoid with indexes and how to utilize compound indexes to maximize index availability with the least amount of write overhead.

*I know I have not been posting blogs for a long time. This was a very busy year, and I took March through July off from conferences in order to buy a house and move.

I am about to give a talk at MySQL Connect about what you need to know before upgrading to MySQL 5.6.

The PDF slides are online at http://bit.ly/upgrade56. I will be posting a video in the next few weeks!

The 3rd season of MySQL Marinate begins October 1st, information pills or if you prefer, price MariaDB or Percona.

If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” on the O’Reilly book page for Learning MySQL. There is homework for week 1, see the master list for all the information.

If you would like to learn MySQL from the ground up, consider joining us. This is for beginners – If you have no experience with MySQL, or if you are a developer that wants to learn how to administer MySQL, or an administrator that wants to learn how to query MySQL, this course is what you want.

If you are not a beginner, you are welcome to join too – maybe you need a refresher, or maybe you just want to test your knowledge or earn badges. That’s OK too!

The format of a virtual self-study group is as follows:

Each participant acquires the same textbook (Learning MySQL, the “butterfly O’Reilly book”, published 2007). You can acquire the textbook however you want (e.g. from the libary or from a friend) but if you buy the book, we ask that you buy it from our Amazon Store, to help pay for meetup fees.

Each participant commits to read one chapter per week, complete the exercises and post a link to the completed work. Tweet using the hashtag #mysqlmarinate.

Each participant obtains assistance by posting questions to a discussion area set up on the Virtual Tech Self Study Message Board for each chapter.

Each participant receives a badge upon finishing each chapter and all assignments.

Note: There is no classroom or video instruction.

How do I get started?

Become a member of the Virtual Tech Self Study Meetup Group.

Register for MySQL Marinate. RSVP to this event: Yes

Acquire the book (the only item that may cost money). Get your hands Learning MySQL – see if your local library has it, if someone is selling their copy, or buy it from our Amazon Store (this helps pay for meetup fees).

When your book arrives, start your virtual learning by reading one chapter per week. Complete the exercises; if you have any questions, comments or want to learn more in-depth, that’s what the forums are for!

Learning MySQL

FAQs:

Q: How long will the course last?

A: We will cover 12 lessons (chapters) in the book, so 12 (twelve) weeks starting October 1st, though we will have one week that is a break so that you can catch up if you need to or you have a week off if you need it. Refer to the MySQL Marinate Season 3 Master Discussion List for specific dates.

By January 1st, 2014, you will know MySQL!!

Q: Can I get ahead?

A: Sure! This is go-at-your-own-pace. To prevent spoilers, please put comments in the appropriate chapter threads.

Q: Does this cover the Percona patch set or MariaDB forks?

A: This covers the basics of MySQL, which are immediately transferable to Percona’s patched MySQL or MariaDB builds.

Q: What do I need in order to start the course?

A: All you need is the book and access to a computer, preferably one that you have control over. Installing MySQL is chapter 2, so really, all you need is the book and a computer to start, you don’t have to worry about any prerequisites. If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” at the O’Reilly Learning MySQL page.

Q: Where can I put completed assignments?

A: You will be able to put completed assignments on github. Instructions are in week 1.

Q: The book was published in 2007. Isn’t that a bit old?

A: Yes! O’Reilly is working on new material, but it is not ready yet. The basics are still accurate, and we will let you know what in the book is outdated. We will also have optional supplemental/”extra credit” material for those who want to learn more right away. We are confident that this self-study course will make you ready to dive into other, more advanced material.

Soak it in!

*either tomorrow or today, depending on when and where you read this. Or it was in the past, if you have to catch up on your blog posts. It’s OK, you can join us late, too. You can go at your own pace.

During yesterday’s MySQL Connect conference, viagra so that all can benefit. The slides for the talk are at http://bit.ly/puppet-mysql-slides.

Recently I gave a new talk to both the Tokyo and Boston MySQL User Groups about how to get started using performance schema. I have put some resources online for those interested:

Performance Schema talk video

PDF slides

The feedback has been excellent, human enhancement so I hope that you find this video useful when trying to learn how to use performance schema and dive into the depth of the information it provides you.

I am doing a quick blog post to announce that I have put an indexing talk online*. Most recently, drug I delivered this indexing talk at Confoo and Scale 11x.

The talk is on YouTube at Are You Getting the Best Out of Your MySQL Indexes? There are also PDF slides.
From the official conference description, visit this site if you want to know more:
MySQL indexes are often used to make performance better. However, more about they can make performance suffer if you are not using them properly. Oracle ACE Director Sheeri Cabral explains the pitfalls to avoid with indexes and how to utilize compound indexes to maximize index availability with the least amount of write overhead.

*I know I have not been posting blogs for a long time. This was a very busy year, and I took March through July off from conferences in order to buy a house and move.

Some folks are reporting that some etherpads are not working after a routine database switchover. We have figured out a way to recover the last known working revision, pilule and have already done so for a handful of etherpads.

We are working to proactively find these etherpads and fix them, but if you have an etherpad that is broken that you want to call attention to, please put it in bug 894913 – https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=894913.

I am about to give a talk at MySQL Connect about what you need to know before upgrading to MySQL 5.6.

The PDF slides are online at http://bit.ly/upgrade56. I will be posting a video in the next few weeks!

The 3rd season of MySQL Marinate begins October 1st, information pills or if you prefer, price MariaDB or Percona.

If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” on the O’Reilly book page for Learning MySQL. There is homework for week 1, see the master list for all the information.

If you would like to learn MySQL from the ground up, consider joining us. This is for beginners – If you have no experience with MySQL, or if you are a developer that wants to learn how to administer MySQL, or an administrator that wants to learn how to query MySQL, this course is what you want.

If you are not a beginner, you are welcome to join too – maybe you need a refresher, or maybe you just want to test your knowledge or earn badges. That’s OK too!

The format of a virtual self-study group is as follows:

Each participant acquires the same textbook (Learning MySQL, the “butterfly O’Reilly book”, published 2007). You can acquire the textbook however you want (e.g. from the libary or from a friend) but if you buy the book, we ask that you buy it from our Amazon Store, to help pay for meetup fees.

Each participant commits to read one chapter per week, complete the exercises and post a link to the completed work. Tweet using the hashtag #mysqlmarinate.

Each participant obtains assistance by posting questions to a discussion area set up on the Virtual Tech Self Study Message Board for each chapter.

Each participant receives a badge upon finishing each chapter and all assignments.

Note: There is no classroom or video instruction.

How do I get started?

Become a member of the Virtual Tech Self Study Meetup Group.

Register for MySQL Marinate. RSVP to this event: Yes

Acquire the book (the only item that may cost money). Get your hands Learning MySQL – see if your local library has it, if someone is selling their copy, or buy it from our Amazon Store (this helps pay for meetup fees).

When your book arrives, start your virtual learning by reading one chapter per week. Complete the exercises; if you have any questions, comments or want to learn more in-depth, that’s what the forums are for!

Learning MySQL

FAQs:

Q: How long will the course last?

A: We will cover 12 lessons (chapters) in the book, so 12 (twelve) weeks starting October 1st, though we will have one week that is a break so that you can catch up if you need to or you have a week off if you need it. Refer to the MySQL Marinate Season 3 Master Discussion List for specific dates.

By January 1st, 2014, you will know MySQL!!

Q: Can I get ahead?

A: Sure! This is go-at-your-own-pace. To prevent spoilers, please put comments in the appropriate chapter threads.

Q: Does this cover the Percona patch set or MariaDB forks?

A: This covers the basics of MySQL, which are immediately transferable to Percona’s patched MySQL or MariaDB builds.

Q: What do I need in order to start the course?

A: All you need is the book and access to a computer, preferably one that you have control over. Installing MySQL is chapter 2, so really, all you need is the book and a computer to start, you don’t have to worry about any prerequisites. If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” at the O’Reilly Learning MySQL page.

Q: Where can I put completed assignments?

A: You will be able to put completed assignments on github. Instructions are in week 1.

Q: The book was published in 2007. Isn’t that a bit old?

A: Yes! O’Reilly is working on new material, but it is not ready yet. The basics are still accurate, and we will let you know what in the book is outdated. We will also have optional supplemental/”extra credit” material for those who want to learn more right away. We are confident that this self-study course will make you ready to dive into other, more advanced material.

Soak it in!

*either tomorrow or today, depending on when and where you read this. Or it was in the past, if you have to catch up on your blog posts. It’s OK, you can join us late, too. You can go at your own pace.

During yesterday’s MySQL Connect conference, viagra so that all can benefit. The slides for the talk are at http://bit.ly/puppet-mysql-slides.

Recently I gave a new talk to both the Tokyo and Boston MySQL User Groups about how to get started using performance schema. I have put some resources online for those interested:

Performance Schema talk video

PDF slides

The feedback has been excellent, human enhancement so I hope that you find this video useful when trying to learn how to use performance schema and dive into the depth of the information it provides you.

I am doing a quick blog post to announce that I have put an indexing talk online*. Most recently, drug I delivered this indexing talk at Confoo and Scale 11x.

The talk is on YouTube at Are You Getting the Best Out of Your MySQL Indexes? There are also PDF slides.
From the official conference description, visit this site if you want to know more:
MySQL indexes are often used to make performance better. However, more about they can make performance suffer if you are not using them properly. Oracle ACE Director Sheeri Cabral explains the pitfalls to avoid with indexes and how to utilize compound indexes to maximize index availability with the least amount of write overhead.

*I know I have not been posting blogs for a long time. This was a very busy year, and I took March through July off from conferences in order to buy a house and move.

Some folks are reporting that some etherpads are not working after a routine database switchover. We have figured out a way to recover the last known working revision, pilule and have already done so for a handful of etherpads.

We are working to proactively find these etherpads and fix them, but if you have an etherpad that is broken that you want to call attention to, please put it in bug 894913 – https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=894913.

One of the chassis in the PHX1 datacenter was experiencing issues which took many services, rubella including those on the generic web cluster offline and degraded others for approximately half an hour. Fixing the issue took approximately 15 minutes. Services should be back to normal.

For reference, the following web services were either downgraded, or unavailable:

generic cluster (contains many web apps)

bouncer
elasticsearch
etherpad
graphite
hangprocessor
input
input-celery
openshift
plugins and plugins memcached
puppetmaster
rabbit
socorro memcache

If you have any questions or concerns please address them to helpdesk@mozilla.com.

I am about to give a talk at MySQL Connect about what you need to know before upgrading to MySQL 5.6.

The PDF slides are online at http://bit.ly/upgrade56. I will be posting a video in the next few weeks!

The 3rd season of MySQL Marinate begins October 1st, information pills or if you prefer, price MariaDB or Percona.

If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” on the O’Reilly book page for Learning MySQL. There is homework for week 1, see the master list for all the information.

If you would like to learn MySQL from the ground up, consider joining us. This is for beginners – If you have no experience with MySQL, or if you are a developer that wants to learn how to administer MySQL, or an administrator that wants to learn how to query MySQL, this course is what you want.

If you are not a beginner, you are welcome to join too – maybe you need a refresher, or maybe you just want to test your knowledge or earn badges. That’s OK too!

The format of a virtual self-study group is as follows:

Each participant acquires the same textbook (Learning MySQL, the “butterfly O’Reilly book”, published 2007). You can acquire the textbook however you want (e.g. from the libary or from a friend) but if you buy the book, we ask that you buy it from our Amazon Store, to help pay for meetup fees.

Each participant commits to read one chapter per week, complete the exercises and post a link to the completed work. Tweet using the hashtag #mysqlmarinate.

Each participant obtains assistance by posting questions to a discussion area set up on the Virtual Tech Self Study Message Board for each chapter.

Each participant receives a badge upon finishing each chapter and all assignments.

Note: There is no classroom or video instruction.

How do I get started?

Become a member of the Virtual Tech Self Study Meetup Group.

Register for MySQL Marinate. RSVP to this event: Yes

Acquire the book (the only item that may cost money). Get your hands Learning MySQL – see if your local library has it, if someone is selling their copy, or buy it from our Amazon Store (this helps pay for meetup fees).

When your book arrives, start your virtual learning by reading one chapter per week. Complete the exercises; if you have any questions, comments or want to learn more in-depth, that’s what the forums are for!

Learning MySQL

FAQs:

Q: How long will the course last?

A: We will cover 12 lessons (chapters) in the book, so 12 (twelve) weeks starting October 1st, though we will have one week that is a break so that you can catch up if you need to or you have a week off if you need it. Refer to the MySQL Marinate Season 3 Master Discussion List for specific dates.

By January 1st, 2014, you will know MySQL!!

Q: Can I get ahead?

A: Sure! This is go-at-your-own-pace. To prevent spoilers, please put comments in the appropriate chapter threads.

Q: Does this cover the Percona patch set or MariaDB forks?

A: This covers the basics of MySQL, which are immediately transferable to Percona’s patched MySQL or MariaDB builds.

Q: What do I need in order to start the course?

A: All you need is the book and access to a computer, preferably one that you have control over. Installing MySQL is chapter 2, so really, all you need is the book and a computer to start, you don’t have to worry about any prerequisites. If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” at the O’Reilly Learning MySQL page.

Q: Where can I put completed assignments?

A: You will be able to put completed assignments on github. Instructions are in week 1.

Q: The book was published in 2007. Isn’t that a bit old?

A: Yes! O’Reilly is working on new material, but it is not ready yet. The basics are still accurate, and we will let you know what in the book is outdated. We will also have optional supplemental/”extra credit” material for those who want to learn more right away. We are confident that this self-study course will make you ready to dive into other, more advanced material.

Soak it in!

*either tomorrow or today, depending on when and where you read this. Or it was in the past, if you have to catch up on your blog posts. It’s OK, you can join us late, too. You can go at your own pace.

During yesterday’s MySQL Connect conference, viagra so that all can benefit. The slides for the talk are at http://bit.ly/puppet-mysql-slides.

Recently I gave a new talk to both the Tokyo and Boston MySQL User Groups about how to get started using performance schema. I have put some resources online for those interested:

Performance Schema talk video

PDF slides

The feedback has been excellent, human enhancement so I hope that you find this video useful when trying to learn how to use performance schema and dive into the depth of the information it provides you.

I am doing a quick blog post to announce that I have put an indexing talk online*. Most recently, drug I delivered this indexing talk at Confoo and Scale 11x.

The talk is on YouTube at Are You Getting the Best Out of Your MySQL Indexes? There are also PDF slides.
From the official conference description, visit this site if you want to know more:
MySQL indexes are often used to make performance better. However, more about they can make performance suffer if you are not using them properly. Oracle ACE Director Sheeri Cabral explains the pitfalls to avoid with indexes and how to utilize compound indexes to maximize index availability with the least amount of write overhead.

*I know I have not been posting blogs for a long time. This was a very busy year, and I took March through July off from conferences in order to buy a house and move.

Some folks are reporting that some etherpads are not working after a routine database switchover. We have figured out a way to recover the last known working revision, pilule and have already done so for a handful of etherpads.

We are working to proactively find these etherpads and fix them, but if you have an etherpad that is broken that you want to call attention to, please put it in bug 894913 – https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=894913.

One of the chassis in the PHX1 datacenter was experiencing issues which took many services, rubella including those on the generic web cluster offline and degraded others for approximately half an hour. Fixing the issue took approximately 15 minutes. Services should be back to normal.

For reference, the following web services were either downgraded, or unavailable:

generic cluster (contains many web apps)

bouncer
elasticsearch
etherpad
graphite
hangprocessor
input
input-celery
openshift
plugins and plugins memcached
puppetmaster
rabbit
socorro memcache

If you have any questions or concerns please address them to helpdesk@mozilla.com.

We have been experiencing intermittent Bugzilla slowness since Wednesday, allergy June 12th 2013 at 5 pm UTC (10 am US/Pacific time). We have been working throughout the weekend to pinpoint the cause of this irregular, and but noticeable, issue. The problem is performance only, there have been no reports and no evidence of data or functionality loss. We will release additional information as we have it.

Update 18 Jun 2013 18:40 pm UTC: The Phoenix chassis outage was completely unrelated to this Bugzilla slowness. Bugzilla is in a different data center and neither caused nor affected the chassis problem, and the only effect the chassis problem had was to pull resources away from figuring out and fixing the bugzilla issue.

I am about to give a talk at MySQL Connect about what you need to know before upgrading to MySQL 5.6.

The PDF slides are online at http://bit.ly/upgrade56. I will be posting a video in the next few weeks!

The 3rd season of MySQL Marinate begins October 1st, information pills or if you prefer, price MariaDB or Percona.

If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” on the O’Reilly book page for Learning MySQL. There is homework for week 1, see the master list for all the information.

If you would like to learn MySQL from the ground up, consider joining us. This is for beginners – If you have no experience with MySQL, or if you are a developer that wants to learn how to administer MySQL, or an administrator that wants to learn how to query MySQL, this course is what you want.

If you are not a beginner, you are welcome to join too – maybe you need a refresher, or maybe you just want to test your knowledge or earn badges. That’s OK too!

The format of a virtual self-study group is as follows:

Each participant acquires the same textbook (Learning MySQL, the “butterfly O’Reilly book”, published 2007). You can acquire the textbook however you want (e.g. from the libary or from a friend) but if you buy the book, we ask that you buy it from our Amazon Store, to help pay for meetup fees.

Each participant commits to read one chapter per week, complete the exercises and post a link to the completed work. Tweet using the hashtag #mysqlmarinate.

Each participant obtains assistance by posting questions to a discussion area set up on the Virtual Tech Self Study Message Board for each chapter.

Each participant receives a badge upon finishing each chapter and all assignments.

Note: There is no classroom or video instruction.

How do I get started?

Become a member of the Virtual Tech Self Study Meetup Group.

Register for MySQL Marinate. RSVP to this event: Yes

Acquire the book (the only item that may cost money). Get your hands Learning MySQL – see if your local library has it, if someone is selling their copy, or buy it from our Amazon Store (this helps pay for meetup fees).

When your book arrives, start your virtual learning by reading one chapter per week. Complete the exercises; if you have any questions, comments or want to learn more in-depth, that’s what the forums are for!

Learning MySQL

FAQs:

Q: How long will the course last?

A: We will cover 12 lessons (chapters) in the book, so 12 (twelve) weeks starting October 1st, though we will have one week that is a break so that you can catch up if you need to or you have a week off if you need it. Refer to the MySQL Marinate Season 3 Master Discussion List for specific dates.

By January 1st, 2014, you will know MySQL!!

Q: Can I get ahead?

A: Sure! This is go-at-your-own-pace. To prevent spoilers, please put comments in the appropriate chapter threads.

Q: Does this cover the Percona patch set or MariaDB forks?

A: This covers the basics of MySQL, which are immediately transferable to Percona’s patched MySQL or MariaDB builds.

Q: What do I need in order to start the course?

A: All you need is the book and access to a computer, preferably one that you have control over. Installing MySQL is chapter 2, so really, all you need is the book and a computer to start, you don’t have to worry about any prerequisites. If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” at the O’Reilly Learning MySQL page.

Q: Where can I put completed assignments?

A: You will be able to put completed assignments on github. Instructions are in week 1.

Q: The book was published in 2007. Isn’t that a bit old?

A: Yes! O’Reilly is working on new material, but it is not ready yet. The basics are still accurate, and we will let you know what in the book is outdated. We will also have optional supplemental/”extra credit” material for those who want to learn more right away. We are confident that this self-study course will make you ready to dive into other, more advanced material.

Soak it in!

*either tomorrow or today, depending on when and where you read this. Or it was in the past, if you have to catch up on your blog posts. It’s OK, you can join us late, too. You can go at your own pace.

During yesterday’s MySQL Connect conference, viagra so that all can benefit. The slides for the talk are at http://bit.ly/puppet-mysql-slides.

Recently I gave a new talk to both the Tokyo and Boston MySQL User Groups about how to get started using performance schema. I have put some resources online for those interested:

Performance Schema talk video

PDF slides

The feedback has been excellent, human enhancement so I hope that you find this video useful when trying to learn how to use performance schema and dive into the depth of the information it provides you.

I am doing a quick blog post to announce that I have put an indexing talk online*. Most recently, drug I delivered this indexing talk at Confoo and Scale 11x.

The talk is on YouTube at Are You Getting the Best Out of Your MySQL Indexes? There are also PDF slides.
From the official conference description, visit this site if you want to know more:
MySQL indexes are often used to make performance better. However, more about they can make performance suffer if you are not using them properly. Oracle ACE Director Sheeri Cabral explains the pitfalls to avoid with indexes and how to utilize compound indexes to maximize index availability with the least amount of write overhead.

*I know I have not been posting blogs for a long time. This was a very busy year, and I took March through July off from conferences in order to buy a house and move.

Some folks are reporting that some etherpads are not working after a routine database switchover. We have figured out a way to recover the last known working revision, pilule and have already done so for a handful of etherpads.

We are working to proactively find these etherpads and fix them, but if you have an etherpad that is broken that you want to call attention to, please put it in bug 894913 – https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=894913.

One of the chassis in the PHX1 datacenter was experiencing issues which took many services, rubella including those on the generic web cluster offline and degraded others for approximately half an hour. Fixing the issue took approximately 15 minutes. Services should be back to normal.

For reference, the following web services were either downgraded, or unavailable:

generic cluster (contains many web apps)

bouncer
elasticsearch
etherpad
graphite
hangprocessor
input
input-celery
openshift
plugins and plugins memcached
puppetmaster
rabbit
socorro memcache

If you have any questions or concerns please address them to helpdesk@mozilla.com.

We have been experiencing intermittent Bugzilla slowness since Wednesday, allergy June 12th 2013 at 5 pm UTC (10 am US/Pacific time). We have been working throughout the weekend to pinpoint the cause of this irregular, and but noticeable, issue. The problem is performance only, there have been no reports and no evidence of data or functionality loss. We will release additional information as we have it.

Update 18 Jun 2013 18:40 pm UTC: The Phoenix chassis outage was completely unrelated to this Bugzilla slowness. Bugzilla is in a different data center and neither caused nor affected the chassis problem, and the only effect the chassis problem had was to pull resources away from figuring out and fixing the bugzilla issue.

Back in November, order talking about a different type of max_allowed_packet problem.

See, view an application had put data into the database, pfizer but could not retrieve it without getting max_allowed_packet. With the help of some really smart community folks (named Jesper Hansen, Brandon Johnson and Shane Bester), we determined that MySQL actually has 2 different max_allowed_packet settings: client and server.

When you change the max_allowed_packet variable, you are changing the server variable if it is in [mysqld] and the client variable if it is in [client] or [mysql] or whatever client you have. As far as we can tell, there’s no way to actually view what the client variable is, as looking at both the session and global max_allowed_packet variable shows you the server variable.

If max_allowed_packet is not set by the client, it defaults to 16M. The proposed solution is to allow it to be increased for non-interactive clients, and the bug has been verified as a “feature request”, though it has not been implemented yet.

I am about to give a talk at MySQL Connect about what you need to know before upgrading to MySQL 5.6.

The PDF slides are online at http://bit.ly/upgrade56. I will be posting a video in the next few weeks!

The 3rd season of MySQL Marinate begins October 1st, information pills or if you prefer, price MariaDB or Percona.

If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” on the O’Reilly book page for Learning MySQL. There is homework for week 1, see the master list for all the information.

If you would like to learn MySQL from the ground up, consider joining us. This is for beginners – If you have no experience with MySQL, or if you are a developer that wants to learn how to administer MySQL, or an administrator that wants to learn how to query MySQL, this course is what you want.

If you are not a beginner, you are welcome to join too – maybe you need a refresher, or maybe you just want to test your knowledge or earn badges. That’s OK too!

The format of a virtual self-study group is as follows:

Each participant acquires the same textbook (Learning MySQL, the “butterfly O’Reilly book”, published 2007). You can acquire the textbook however you want (e.g. from the libary or from a friend) but if you buy the book, we ask that you buy it from our Amazon Store, to help pay for meetup fees.

Each participant commits to read one chapter per week, complete the exercises and post a link to the completed work. Tweet using the hashtag #mysqlmarinate.

Each participant obtains assistance by posting questions to a discussion area set up on the Virtual Tech Self Study Message Board for each chapter.

Each participant receives a badge upon finishing each chapter and all assignments.

Note: There is no classroom or video instruction.

How do I get started?

Become a member of the Virtual Tech Self Study Meetup Group.

Register for MySQL Marinate. RSVP to this event: Yes

Acquire the book (the only item that may cost money). Get your hands Learning MySQL – see if your local library has it, if someone is selling their copy, or buy it from our Amazon Store (this helps pay for meetup fees).

When your book arrives, start your virtual learning by reading one chapter per week. Complete the exercises; if you have any questions, comments or want to learn more in-depth, that’s what the forums are for!

Learning MySQL

FAQs:

Q: How long will the course last?

A: We will cover 12 lessons (chapters) in the book, so 12 (twelve) weeks starting October 1st, though we will have one week that is a break so that you can catch up if you need to or you have a week off if you need it. Refer to the MySQL Marinate Season 3 Master Discussion List for specific dates.

By January 1st, 2014, you will know MySQL!!

Q: Can I get ahead?

A: Sure! This is go-at-your-own-pace. To prevent spoilers, please put comments in the appropriate chapter threads.

Q: Does this cover the Percona patch set or MariaDB forks?

A: This covers the basics of MySQL, which are immediately transferable to Percona’s patched MySQL or MariaDB builds.

Q: What do I need in order to start the course?

A: All you need is the book and access to a computer, preferably one that you have control over. Installing MySQL is chapter 2, so really, all you need is the book and a computer to start, you don’t have to worry about any prerequisites. If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” at the O’Reilly Learning MySQL page.

Q: Where can I put completed assignments?

A: You will be able to put completed assignments on github. Instructions are in week 1.

Q: The book was published in 2007. Isn’t that a bit old?

A: Yes! O’Reilly is working on new material, but it is not ready yet. The basics are still accurate, and we will let you know what in the book is outdated. We will also have optional supplemental/”extra credit” material for those who want to learn more right away. We are confident that this self-study course will make you ready to dive into other, more advanced material.

Soak it in!

*either tomorrow or today, depending on when and where you read this. Or it was in the past, if you have to catch up on your blog posts. It’s OK, you can join us late, too. You can go at your own pace.

During yesterday’s MySQL Connect conference, viagra so that all can benefit. The slides for the talk are at http://bit.ly/puppet-mysql-slides.

Recently I gave a new talk to both the Tokyo and Boston MySQL User Groups about how to get started using performance schema. I have put some resources online for those interested:

Performance Schema talk video

PDF slides

The feedback has been excellent, human enhancement so I hope that you find this video useful when trying to learn how to use performance schema and dive into the depth of the information it provides you.

I am doing a quick blog post to announce that I have put an indexing talk online*. Most recently, drug I delivered this indexing talk at Confoo and Scale 11x.

The talk is on YouTube at Are You Getting the Best Out of Your MySQL Indexes? There are also PDF slides.
From the official conference description, visit this site if you want to know more:
MySQL indexes are often used to make performance better. However, more about they can make performance suffer if you are not using them properly. Oracle ACE Director Sheeri Cabral explains the pitfalls to avoid with indexes and how to utilize compound indexes to maximize index availability with the least amount of write overhead.

*I know I have not been posting blogs for a long time. This was a very busy year, and I took March through July off from conferences in order to buy a house and move.

Some folks are reporting that some etherpads are not working after a routine database switchover. We have figured out a way to recover the last known working revision, pilule and have already done so for a handful of etherpads.

We are working to proactively find these etherpads and fix them, but if you have an etherpad that is broken that you want to call attention to, please put it in bug 894913 – https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=894913.

One of the chassis in the PHX1 datacenter was experiencing issues which took many services, rubella including those on the generic web cluster offline and degraded others for approximately half an hour. Fixing the issue took approximately 15 minutes. Services should be back to normal.

For reference, the following web services were either downgraded, or unavailable:

generic cluster (contains many web apps)

bouncer
elasticsearch
etherpad
graphite
hangprocessor
input
input-celery
openshift
plugins and plugins memcached
puppetmaster
rabbit
socorro memcache

If you have any questions or concerns please address them to helpdesk@mozilla.com.

We have been experiencing intermittent Bugzilla slowness since Wednesday, allergy June 12th 2013 at 5 pm UTC (10 am US/Pacific time). We have been working throughout the weekend to pinpoint the cause of this irregular, and but noticeable, issue. The problem is performance only, there have been no reports and no evidence of data or functionality loss. We will release additional information as we have it.

Update 18 Jun 2013 18:40 pm UTC: The Phoenix chassis outage was completely unrelated to this Bugzilla slowness. Bugzilla is in a different data center and neither caused nor affected the chassis problem, and the only effect the chassis problem had was to pull resources away from figuring out and fixing the bugzilla issue.

Back in November, order talking about a different type of max_allowed_packet problem.

See, view an application had put data into the database, pfizer but could not retrieve it without getting max_allowed_packet. With the help of some really smart community folks (named Jesper Hansen, Brandon Johnson and Shane Bester), we determined that MySQL actually has 2 different max_allowed_packet settings: client and server.

When you change the max_allowed_packet variable, you are changing the server variable if it is in [mysqld] and the client variable if it is in [client] or [mysql] or whatever client you have. As far as we can tell, there’s no way to actually view what the client variable is, as looking at both the session and global max_allowed_packet variable shows you the server variable.

If max_allowed_packet is not set by the client, it defaults to 16M. The proposed solution is to allow it to be increased for non-interactive clients, and the bug has been verified as a “feature request”, though it has not been implemented yet.

I was playing around with MySQL Workbench earlier in the week, site so they are more readable.

Here is a typical complex query that looks pretty good formatted in the results from a performance schema query:
query from performance schema

Simply click the “broom” icon and watch as your SQL is cleaned up, doctor with one field in the SELECT per line and the JOINs indented and formatted prettily:
nicer, cleaned up SQL

Pretty cool, for just the click of a button!

I am about to give a talk at MySQL Connect about what you need to know before upgrading to MySQL 5.6.

The PDF slides are online at http://bit.ly/upgrade56. I will be posting a video in the next few weeks!

The 3rd season of MySQL Marinate begins October 1st, information pills or if you prefer, price MariaDB or Percona.

If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” on the O’Reilly book page for Learning MySQL. There is homework for week 1, see the master list for all the information.

If you would like to learn MySQL from the ground up, consider joining us. This is for beginners – If you have no experience with MySQL, or if you are a developer that wants to learn how to administer MySQL, or an administrator that wants to learn how to query MySQL, this course is what you want.

If you are not a beginner, you are welcome to join too – maybe you need a refresher, or maybe you just want to test your knowledge or earn badges. That’s OK too!

The format of a virtual self-study group is as follows:

Each participant acquires the same textbook (Learning MySQL, the “butterfly O’Reilly book”, published 2007). You can acquire the textbook however you want (e.g. from the libary or from a friend) but if you buy the book, we ask that you buy it from our Amazon Store, to help pay for meetup fees.

Each participant commits to read one chapter per week, complete the exercises and post a link to the completed work. Tweet using the hashtag #mysqlmarinate.

Each participant obtains assistance by posting questions to a discussion area set up on the Virtual Tech Self Study Message Board for each chapter.

Each participant receives a badge upon finishing each chapter and all assignments.

Note: There is no classroom or video instruction.

How do I get started?

Become a member of the Virtual Tech Self Study Meetup Group.

Register for MySQL Marinate. RSVP to this event: Yes

Acquire the book (the only item that may cost money). Get your hands Learning MySQL – see if your local library has it, if someone is selling their copy, or buy it from our Amazon Store (this helps pay for meetup fees).

When your book arrives, start your virtual learning by reading one chapter per week. Complete the exercises; if you have any questions, comments or want to learn more in-depth, that’s what the forums are for!

Learning MySQL

FAQs:

Q: How long will the course last?

A: We will cover 12 lessons (chapters) in the book, so 12 (twelve) weeks starting October 1st, though we will have one week that is a break so that you can catch up if you need to or you have a week off if you need it. Refer to the MySQL Marinate Season 3 Master Discussion List for specific dates.

By January 1st, 2014, you will know MySQL!!

Q: Can I get ahead?

A: Sure! This is go-at-your-own-pace. To prevent spoilers, please put comments in the appropriate chapter threads.

Q: Does this cover the Percona patch set or MariaDB forks?

A: This covers the basics of MySQL, which are immediately transferable to Percona’s patched MySQL or MariaDB builds.

Q: What do I need in order to start the course?

A: All you need is the book and access to a computer, preferably one that you have control over. Installing MySQL is chapter 2, so really, all you need is the book and a computer to start, you don’t have to worry about any prerequisites. If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” at the O’Reilly Learning MySQL page.

Q: Where can I put completed assignments?

A: You will be able to put completed assignments on github. Instructions are in week 1.

Q: The book was published in 2007. Isn’t that a bit old?

A: Yes! O’Reilly is working on new material, but it is not ready yet. The basics are still accurate, and we will let you know what in the book is outdated. We will also have optional supplemental/”extra credit” material for those who want to learn more right away. We are confident that this self-study course will make you ready to dive into other, more advanced material.

Soak it in!

*either tomorrow or today, depending on when and where you read this. Or it was in the past, if you have to catch up on your blog posts. It’s OK, you can join us late, too. You can go at your own pace.

During yesterday’s MySQL Connect conference, viagra so that all can benefit. The slides for the talk are at http://bit.ly/puppet-mysql-slides.

Recently I gave a new talk to both the Tokyo and Boston MySQL User Groups about how to get started using performance schema. I have put some resources online for those interested:

Performance Schema talk video

PDF slides

The feedback has been excellent, human enhancement so I hope that you find this video useful when trying to learn how to use performance schema and dive into the depth of the information it provides you.

I am doing a quick blog post to announce that I have put an indexing talk online*. Most recently, drug I delivered this indexing talk at Confoo and Scale 11x.

The talk is on YouTube at Are You Getting the Best Out of Your MySQL Indexes? There are also PDF slides.
From the official conference description, visit this site if you want to know more:
MySQL indexes are often used to make performance better. However, more about they can make performance suffer if you are not using them properly. Oracle ACE Director Sheeri Cabral explains the pitfalls to avoid with indexes and how to utilize compound indexes to maximize index availability with the least amount of write overhead.

*I know I have not been posting blogs for a long time. This was a very busy year, and I took March through July off from conferences in order to buy a house and move.

Some folks are reporting that some etherpads are not working after a routine database switchover. We have figured out a way to recover the last known working revision, pilule and have already done so for a handful of etherpads.

We are working to proactively find these etherpads and fix them, but if you have an etherpad that is broken that you want to call attention to, please put it in bug 894913 – https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=894913.

One of the chassis in the PHX1 datacenter was experiencing issues which took many services, rubella including those on the generic web cluster offline and degraded others for approximately half an hour. Fixing the issue took approximately 15 minutes. Services should be back to normal.

For reference, the following web services were either downgraded, or unavailable:

generic cluster (contains many web apps)

bouncer
elasticsearch
etherpad
graphite
hangprocessor
input
input-celery
openshift
plugins and plugins memcached
puppetmaster
rabbit
socorro memcache

If you have any questions or concerns please address them to helpdesk@mozilla.com.

We have been experiencing intermittent Bugzilla slowness since Wednesday, allergy June 12th 2013 at 5 pm UTC (10 am US/Pacific time). We have been working throughout the weekend to pinpoint the cause of this irregular, and but noticeable, issue. The problem is performance only, there have been no reports and no evidence of data or functionality loss. We will release additional information as we have it.

Update 18 Jun 2013 18:40 pm UTC: The Phoenix chassis outage was completely unrelated to this Bugzilla slowness. Bugzilla is in a different data center and neither caused nor affected the chassis problem, and the only effect the chassis problem had was to pull resources away from figuring out and fixing the bugzilla issue.

Back in November, order talking about a different type of max_allowed_packet problem.

See, view an application had put data into the database, pfizer but could not retrieve it without getting max_allowed_packet. With the help of some really smart community folks (named Jesper Hansen, Brandon Johnson and Shane Bester), we determined that MySQL actually has 2 different max_allowed_packet settings: client and server.

When you change the max_allowed_packet variable, you are changing the server variable if it is in [mysqld] and the client variable if it is in [client] or [mysql] or whatever client you have. As far as we can tell, there’s no way to actually view what the client variable is, as looking at both the session and global max_allowed_packet variable shows you the server variable.

If max_allowed_packet is not set by the client, it defaults to 16M. The proposed solution is to allow it to be increased for non-interactive clients, and the bug has been verified as a “feature request”, though it has not been implemented yet.

I was playing around with MySQL Workbench earlier in the week, site so they are more readable.

Here is a typical complex query that looks pretty good formatted in the results from a performance schema query:
query from performance schema

Simply click the “broom” icon and watch as your SQL is cleaned up, doctor with one field in the SELECT per line and the JOINs indented and formatted prettily:
nicer, cleaned up SQL

Pretty cool, for just the click of a button!

It has been over a year since the last OurSQL podcast. First, pharmacist .

But enough about the past…..In this first Drizzle podcast, Jay Pipes and I talk about what Drizzle is and how Drizzle is different from MySQL both technically and from a community standpoint.

The podcast can be downloaded (5.76 Mb as an mp3 file) or played right through your browser at http://technocation.org/content/drizzle-podcast-%25231. The show notes are also on that page.

I am about to give a talk at MySQL Connect about what you need to know before upgrading to MySQL 5.6.

The PDF slides are online at http://bit.ly/upgrade56. I will be posting a video in the next few weeks!

The 3rd season of MySQL Marinate begins October 1st, information pills or if you prefer, price MariaDB or Percona.

If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” on the O’Reilly book page for Learning MySQL. There is homework for week 1, see the master list for all the information.

If you would like to learn MySQL from the ground up, consider joining us. This is for beginners – If you have no experience with MySQL, or if you are a developer that wants to learn how to administer MySQL, or an administrator that wants to learn how to query MySQL, this course is what you want.

If you are not a beginner, you are welcome to join too – maybe you need a refresher, or maybe you just want to test your knowledge or earn badges. That’s OK too!

The format of a virtual self-study group is as follows:

Each participant acquires the same textbook (Learning MySQL, the “butterfly O’Reilly book”, published 2007). You can acquire the textbook however you want (e.g. from the libary or from a friend) but if you buy the book, we ask that you buy it from our Amazon Store, to help pay for meetup fees.

Each participant commits to read one chapter per week, complete the exercises and post a link to the completed work. Tweet using the hashtag #mysqlmarinate.

Each participant obtains assistance by posting questions to a discussion area set up on the Virtual Tech Self Study Message Board for each chapter.

Each participant receives a badge upon finishing each chapter and all assignments.

Note: There is no classroom or video instruction.

How do I get started?

Become a member of the Virtual Tech Self Study Meetup Group.

Register for MySQL Marinate. RSVP to this event: Yes

Acquire the book (the only item that may cost money). Get your hands Learning MySQL – see if your local library has it, if someone is selling their copy, or buy it from our Amazon Store (this helps pay for meetup fees).

When your book arrives, start your virtual learning by reading one chapter per week. Complete the exercises; if you have any questions, comments or want to learn more in-depth, that’s what the forums are for!

Learning MySQL

FAQs:

Q: How long will the course last?

A: We will cover 12 lessons (chapters) in the book, so 12 (twelve) weeks starting October 1st, though we will have one week that is a break so that you can catch up if you need to or you have a week off if you need it. Refer to the MySQL Marinate Season 3 Master Discussion List for specific dates.

By January 1st, 2014, you will know MySQL!!

Q: Can I get ahead?

A: Sure! This is go-at-your-own-pace. To prevent spoilers, please put comments in the appropriate chapter threads.

Q: Does this cover the Percona patch set or MariaDB forks?

A: This covers the basics of MySQL, which are immediately transferable to Percona’s patched MySQL or MariaDB builds.

Q: What do I need in order to start the course?

A: All you need is the book and access to a computer, preferably one that you have control over. Installing MySQL is chapter 2, so really, all you need is the book and a computer to start, you don’t have to worry about any prerequisites. If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” at the O’Reilly Learning MySQL page.

Q: Where can I put completed assignments?

A: You will be able to put completed assignments on github. Instructions are in week 1.

Q: The book was published in 2007. Isn’t that a bit old?

A: Yes! O’Reilly is working on new material, but it is not ready yet. The basics are still accurate, and we will let you know what in the book is outdated. We will also have optional supplemental/”extra credit” material for those who want to learn more right away. We are confident that this self-study course will make you ready to dive into other, more advanced material.

Soak it in!

*either tomorrow or today, depending on when and where you read this. Or it was in the past, if you have to catch up on your blog posts. It’s OK, you can join us late, too. You can go at your own pace.

During yesterday’s MySQL Connect conference, viagra so that all can benefit. The slides for the talk are at http://bit.ly/puppet-mysql-slides.

Recently I gave a new talk to both the Tokyo and Boston MySQL User Groups about how to get started using performance schema. I have put some resources online for those interested:

Performance Schema talk video

PDF slides

The feedback has been excellent, human enhancement so I hope that you find this video useful when trying to learn how to use performance schema and dive into the depth of the information it provides you.

I am doing a quick blog post to announce that I have put an indexing talk online*. Most recently, drug I delivered this indexing talk at Confoo and Scale 11x.

The talk is on YouTube at Are You Getting the Best Out of Your MySQL Indexes? There are also PDF slides.
From the official conference description, visit this site if you want to know more:
MySQL indexes are often used to make performance better. However, more about they can make performance suffer if you are not using them properly. Oracle ACE Director Sheeri Cabral explains the pitfalls to avoid with indexes and how to utilize compound indexes to maximize index availability with the least amount of write overhead.

*I know I have not been posting blogs for a long time. This was a very busy year, and I took March through July off from conferences in order to buy a house and move.

Some folks are reporting that some etherpads are not working after a routine database switchover. We have figured out a way to recover the last known working revision, pilule and have already done so for a handful of etherpads.

We are working to proactively find these etherpads and fix them, but if you have an etherpad that is broken that you want to call attention to, please put it in bug 894913 – https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=894913.

One of the chassis in the PHX1 datacenter was experiencing issues which took many services, rubella including those on the generic web cluster offline and degraded others for approximately half an hour. Fixing the issue took approximately 15 minutes. Services should be back to normal.

For reference, the following web services were either downgraded, or unavailable:

generic cluster (contains many web apps)

bouncer
elasticsearch
etherpad
graphite
hangprocessor
input
input-celery
openshift
plugins and plugins memcached
puppetmaster
rabbit
socorro memcache

If you have any questions or concerns please address them to helpdesk@mozilla.com.

We have been experiencing intermittent Bugzilla slowness since Wednesday, allergy June 12th 2013 at 5 pm UTC (10 am US/Pacific time). We have been working throughout the weekend to pinpoint the cause of this irregular, and but noticeable, issue. The problem is performance only, there have been no reports and no evidence of data or functionality loss. We will release additional information as we have it.

Update 18 Jun 2013 18:40 pm UTC: The Phoenix chassis outage was completely unrelated to this Bugzilla slowness. Bugzilla is in a different data center and neither caused nor affected the chassis problem, and the only effect the chassis problem had was to pull resources away from figuring out and fixing the bugzilla issue.

Back in November, order talking about a different type of max_allowed_packet problem.

See, view an application had put data into the database, pfizer but could not retrieve it without getting max_allowed_packet. With the help of some really smart community folks (named Jesper Hansen, Brandon Johnson and Shane Bester), we determined that MySQL actually has 2 different max_allowed_packet settings: client and server.

When you change the max_allowed_packet variable, you are changing the server variable if it is in [mysqld] and the client variable if it is in [client] or [mysql] or whatever client you have. As far as we can tell, there’s no way to actually view what the client variable is, as looking at both the session and global max_allowed_packet variable shows you the server variable.

If max_allowed_packet is not set by the client, it defaults to 16M. The proposed solution is to allow it to be increased for non-interactive clients, and the bug has been verified as a “feature request”, though it has not been implemented yet.

I was playing around with MySQL Workbench earlier in the week, site so they are more readable.

Here is a typical complex query that looks pretty good formatted in the results from a performance schema query:
query from performance schema

Simply click the “broom” icon and watch as your SQL is cleaned up, doctor with one field in the SELECT per line and the JOINs indented and formatted prettily:
nicer, cleaned up SQL

Pretty cool, for just the click of a button!

It has been over a year since the last OurSQL podcast. First, pharmacist .

But enough about the past…..In this first Drizzle podcast, Jay Pipes and I talk about what Drizzle is and how Drizzle is different from MySQL both technically and from a community standpoint.

The podcast can be downloaded (5.76 Mb as an mp3 file) or played right through your browser at http://technocation.org/content/drizzle-podcast-%25231. The show notes are also on that page.

I have been talking more and more with colleagues about the Open Source community and licenses. “People with bad intentions will do bad things . . . often regardless of the license on the work.”

And, breast license, approved it is still possible for my work to be plagiarized, and if it is, I will still feel violated.

Many of us who use Creative Commons or MySQL have an Open Source mentality. We often do not see value in pirating software—why would we use Microsoft Word (a legally licensed copy, or pirated) if we can use OpenOffice or NeoOffice?

In the same manner as Steal This Book, we rebel. But instead of stealing, we make things with less restrictive licenses, so that we can give them away for free, and so that people don’t bear the stigma of having to steal to get what they should rightfully have (good, accessible software). We encourage feed aggregators such as planetmysql to re-use our content.

Of course, we believe that just because we are “long-haired sandal-wearing hippies”, everyone else involved in Open Source is, too. Much as the preface to Steal This Book asserts, we believe:

Our moral dictionary says no heisting from each other. To steal from a brother or sister is evil.

So it surprises me when I encounter people in an Open Source community who have, in fact, stolen from others in their own community. It’s so easy to not steal, that I am amazed that there are people who actually go out of their way to steal on purpose.

According to Wikipedia, “Plagiarism is the use or close imitation of the language and ideas of another author and representation of them as one’s own original work.” For example, had I not quoted Wikipedia as the source of the definition, and just stated the definition without any citation, I would have committed an act of plagiarism.

Had I done the same with the MySQL Manual, I would be guilty also of plagiarism and copyright infringement, because the MySQL Manual is copyrighted; permission to use the material in the MySQL Manual must be granted.

Arjen Lentz wrote an article about MySQL AB’s expected employee principles, and asked what people would add to the list. Included on the list is, “Aim to be good citizens.”

Good citizens do not steal or plagiarize. Good citizens treat others how they themselves want to be treated, and this goes beyond stealing and plagiarism—if someone hurts or maligns him or her, good citizens will keep on doing what they’re doing. Hate and vengeance have no place in their hearts. To (probably misquote) Sun Tzu: “Never explain. Your friends do not need it, and your enemies will not believe it anyway.”

The points I am trying to drive home are that a good citizen is not merely someone who adds value to the community; a good citizen also does not detract from the community by stealing, plagiarizing, or spreading hate.

I am about to give a talk at MySQL Connect about what you need to know before upgrading to MySQL 5.6.

The PDF slides are online at http://bit.ly/upgrade56. I will be posting a video in the next few weeks!

The 3rd season of MySQL Marinate begins October 1st, information pills or if you prefer, price MariaDB or Percona.

If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” on the O’Reilly book page for Learning MySQL. There is homework for week 1, see the master list for all the information.

If you would like to learn MySQL from the ground up, consider joining us. This is for beginners – If you have no experience with MySQL, or if you are a developer that wants to learn how to administer MySQL, or an administrator that wants to learn how to query MySQL, this course is what you want.

If you are not a beginner, you are welcome to join too – maybe you need a refresher, or maybe you just want to test your knowledge or earn badges. That’s OK too!

The format of a virtual self-study group is as follows:

Each participant acquires the same textbook (Learning MySQL, the “butterfly O’Reilly book”, published 2007). You can acquire the textbook however you want (e.g. from the libary or from a friend) but if you buy the book, we ask that you buy it from our Amazon Store, to help pay for meetup fees.

Each participant commits to read one chapter per week, complete the exercises and post a link to the completed work. Tweet using the hashtag #mysqlmarinate.

Each participant obtains assistance by posting questions to a discussion area set up on the Virtual Tech Self Study Message Board for each chapter.

Each participant receives a badge upon finishing each chapter and all assignments.

Note: There is no classroom or video instruction.

How do I get started?

Become a member of the Virtual Tech Self Study Meetup Group.

Register for MySQL Marinate. RSVP to this event: Yes

Acquire the book (the only item that may cost money). Get your hands Learning MySQL – see if your local library has it, if someone is selling their copy, or buy it from our Amazon Store (this helps pay for meetup fees).

When your book arrives, start your virtual learning by reading one chapter per week. Complete the exercises; if you have any questions, comments or want to learn more in-depth, that’s what the forums are for!

Learning MySQL

FAQs:

Q: How long will the course last?

A: We will cover 12 lessons (chapters) in the book, so 12 (twelve) weeks starting October 1st, though we will have one week that is a break so that you can catch up if you need to or you have a week off if you need it. Refer to the MySQL Marinate Season 3 Master Discussion List for specific dates.

By January 1st, 2014, you will know MySQL!!

Q: Can I get ahead?

A: Sure! This is go-at-your-own-pace. To prevent spoilers, please put comments in the appropriate chapter threads.

Q: Does this cover the Percona patch set or MariaDB forks?

A: This covers the basics of MySQL, which are immediately transferable to Percona’s patched MySQL or MariaDB builds.

Q: What do I need in order to start the course?

A: All you need is the book and access to a computer, preferably one that you have control over. Installing MySQL is chapter 2, so really, all you need is the book and a computer to start, you don’t have to worry about any prerequisites. If you do not have the book yet, you can still do the first week by using the online material from “Browse Contents” at the O’Reilly Learning MySQL page.

Q: Where can I put completed assignments?

A: You will be able to put completed assignments on github. Instructions are in week 1.

Q: The book was published in 2007. Isn’t that a bit old?

A: Yes! O’Reilly is working on new material, but it is not ready yet. The basics are still accurate, and we will let you know what in the book is outdated. We will also have optional supplemental/”extra credit” material for those who want to learn more right away. We are confident that this self-study course will make you ready to dive into other, more advanced material.

Soak it in!

*either tomorrow or today, depending on when and where you read this. Or it was in the past, if you have to catch up on your blog posts. It’s OK, you can join us late, too. You can go at your own pace.

During yesterday’s MySQL Connect conference, viagra so that all can benefit. The slides for the talk are at http://bit.ly/puppet-mysql-slides.

Recently I gave a new talk to both the Tokyo and Boston MySQL User Groups about how to get started using performance schema. I have put some resources online for those interested:

Performance Schema talk video

PDF slides

The feedback has been excellent, human enhancement so I hope that you find this video useful when trying to learn how to use performance schema and dive into the depth of the information it provides you.

I am doing a quick blog post to announce that I have put an indexing talk online*. Most recently, drug I delivered this indexing talk at Confoo and Scale 11x.

The talk is on YouTube at Are You Getting the Best Out of Your MySQL Indexes? There are also PDF slides.
From the official conference description, visit this site if you want to know more:
MySQL indexes are often used to make performance better. However, more about they can make performance suffer if you are not using them properly. Oracle ACE Director Sheeri Cabral explains the pitfalls to avoid with indexes and how to utilize compound indexes to maximize index availability with the least amount of write overhead.

*I know I have not been posting blogs for a long time. This was a very busy year, and I took March through July off from conferences in order to buy a house and move.

Some folks are reporting that some etherpads are not working after a routine database switchover. We have figured out a way to recover the last known working revision, pilule and have already done so for a handful of etherpads.

We are working to proactively find these etherpads and fix them, but if you have an etherpad that is broken that you want to call attention to, please put it in bug 894913 – https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=894913.

One of the chassis in the PHX1 datacenter was experiencing issues which took many services, rubella including those on the generic web cluster offline and degraded others for approximately half an hour. Fixing the issue took approximately 15 minutes. Services should be back to normal.

For reference, the following web services were either downgraded, or unavailable:

generic cluster (contains many web apps)

bouncer
elasticsearch
etherpad
graphite
hangprocessor
input
input-celery
openshift
plugins and plugins memcached
puppetmaster
rabbit
socorro memcache

If you have any questions or concerns please address them to helpdesk@mozilla.com.

We have been experiencing intermittent Bugzilla slowness since Wednesday, allergy June 12th 2013 at 5 pm UTC (10 am US/Pacific time). We have been working throughout the weekend to pinpoint the cause of this irregular, and but noticeable, issue. The problem is performance only, there have been no reports and no evidence of data or functionality loss. We will release additional information as we have it.

Update 18 Jun 2013 18:40 pm UTC: The Phoenix chassis outage was completely unrelated to this Bugzilla slowness. Bugzilla is in a different data center and neither caused nor affected the chassis problem, and the only effect the chassis problem had was to pull resources away from figuring out and fixing the bugzilla issue.

Back in November, order talking about a different type of max_allowed_packet problem.

See, view an application had put data into the database, pfizer but could not retrieve it without getting max_allowed_packet. With the help of some really smart community folks (named Jesper Hansen, Brandon Johnson and Shane Bester), we determined that MySQL actually has 2 different max_allowed_packet settings: client and server.

When you change the max_allowed_packet variable, you are changing the server variable if it is in [mysqld] and the client variable if it is in [client] or [mysql] or whatever client you have. As far as we can tell, there’s no way to actually view what the client variable is, as looking at both the session and global max_allowed_packet variable shows you the server variable.

If max_allowed_packet is not set by the client, it defaults to 16M. The proposed solution is to allow it to be increased for non-interactive clients, and the bug has been verified as a “feature request”, though it has not been implemented yet.

I was playing around with MySQL Workbench earlier in the week, site so they are more readable.

Here is a typical complex query that looks pretty good formatted in the results from a performance schema query:
query from performance schema

Simply click the “broom” icon and watch as your SQL is cleaned up, doctor with one field in the SELECT per line and the JOINs indented and formatted prettily:
nicer, cleaned up SQL

Pretty cool, for just the click of a button!

It has been over a year since the last OurSQL podcast. First, pharmacist .

But enough about the past…..In this first Drizzle podcast, Jay Pipes and I talk about what Drizzle is and how Drizzle is different from MySQL both technically and from a community standpoint.

The podcast can be downloaded (5.76 Mb as an mp3 file) or played right through your browser at http://technocation.org/content/drizzle-podcast-%25231. The show notes are also on that page.

I have been talking more and more with colleagues about the Open Source community and licenses. “People with bad intentions will do bad things . . . often regardless of the license on the work.”

And, breast license, approved it is still possible for my work to be plagiarized, and if it is, I will still feel violated.

Many of us who use Creative Commons or MySQL have an Open Source mentality. We often do not see value in pirating software—why would we use Microsoft Word (a legally licensed copy, or pirated) if we can use OpenOffice or NeoOffice?

In the same manner as Steal This Book, we rebel. But instead of stealing, we make things with less restrictive licenses, so that we can give them away for free, and so that people don’t bear the stigma of having to steal to get what they should rightfully have (good, accessible software). We encourage feed aggregators such as planetmysql to re-use our content.

Of course, we believe that just because we are “long-haired sandal-wearing hippies”, everyone else involved in Open Source is, too. Much as the preface to Steal This Book asserts, we believe:

Our moral dictionary says no heisting from each other. To steal from a brother or sister is evil.

So it surprises me when I encounter people in an Open Source community who have, in fact, stolen from others in their own community. It’s so easy to not steal, that I am amazed that there are people who actually go out of their way to steal on purpose.

According to Wikipedia, “Plagiarism is the use or close imitation of the language and ideas of another author and representation of them as one’s own original work.” For example, had I not quoted Wikipedia as the source of the definition, and just stated the definition without any citation, I would have committed an act of plagiarism.

Had I done the same with the MySQL Manual, I would be guilty also of plagiarism and copyright infringement, because the MySQL Manual is copyrighted; permission to use the material in the MySQL Manual must be granted.

Arjen Lentz wrote an article about MySQL AB’s expected employee principles, and asked what people would add to the list. Included on the list is, “Aim to be good citizens.”

Good citizens do not steal or plagiarize. Good citizens treat others how they themselves want to be treated, and this goes beyond stealing and plagiarism—if someone hurts or maligns him or her, good citizens will keep on doing what they’re doing. Hate and vengeance have no place in their hearts. To (probably misquote) Sun Tzu: “Never explain. Your friends do not need it, and your enemies will not believe it anyway.”

The points I am trying to drive home are that a good citizen is not merely someone who adds value to the community; a good citizen also does not detract from the community by stealing, plagiarizing, or spreading hate.

One of the chassis in the PHX1 datacenter was experiencing issues which took many services, resuscitation including those on the generic web cluster offline and degraded others for approximately half an hour. Fixing the issue took approximately 15 minutes. Services should be back to normal.

For reference, the following web services were either downgraded, or unavailable:

generic cluster (contains many web apps)

bouncer
elasticsearch
etherpad
graphite
hangprocessor
input
input-celery
openshift
plugins and plugins memcached
puppetmaster
rabbit
socorro memcache

If you have any questions or concerns please address them to helpdesk@mozilla.com.